Infuse Spirits Rebrands Whiskey Brand Under New Name “Broken Barrel Whiskey,” Commencing with the Limited-Edition Single Oak Series – American Whiskey News

Infuse Spirits Rebrands Whiskey Brand Under New Name “Broken Barrel Whiskey,” Commencing with the Limited-Edition Single Oak Series

Infuse Spirits Group L.L.C., the first and only single-bottle infusion company and the spirit industry’s most popular craft infusion company, is excited to announce the rebranding of its whiskey line under the aptly named Broken Barrel Whiskey Co.

When Infuse Spirits first expanded its portfolio to include a Kentucky Bourbon called Broken Barrel, followed by the gold-medal winning Heresy Rye Whiskey, both delivered a message and method that became instantly discernible from Infuse’s vodkas and bitters. Whereas Infuse Spirits continues to steep its ingredients in the single-bottle infusions, Broken Barrel finishes and matures it’s whiskey with French Oak, ex-bourbon, and sherry cask staves in tanks before straining and bottling. This not only separates the two brands by process and style but illustrates how Broken Barrel Whiskey is unapologetically different from other whiskeys. Similar to a mash bill and equally as important, the company’s coined process called the Oak Bill—the selection of various oak barrel staves used to finish our products—is what defines the whiskey.

In this way, “the whiskeys follow their own path and seek to create a name for themselves by adhering to principles of originality, boundary-crossing, and unapologetic authenticity. By adding the barrel to the whiskey, not the whiskey to the barrel concept, we have created something different,” says Founder and Creator Seth Benhaim. If you are a collector, feel free to snag the fleeting designs of the “Infuse Spirits” titled whiskeys, as these will be discontinued and likely gone by early 2020, if not sooner! However, Broken Barrel Whiskey’s core products, Broken Barrel Bourbon and Heresy Rye, will not change price or recipes—they’ll remain the same as everyone knows and loves them.

So, now, the question: how does a rule-breaking producer continue to push the envelope? The limited-edition Single Oak Series is Broken Barrel Whiskey’s latest innovation. Under the new brand name, the company is releasing one-of-a-kind, limited bottlings of its Single Oak Series, which will offer three distinct expressions of oak-infused whiskey—Mizunara (50 ABV, 750 ml); Isle Of Peat (50 ABV, 750 ml); and Cask Of Amontillado (55 ABV, 750 ml)—with a suggested retail price of $50.

As Seth explains, “We deliver one-of-a-kind collaborations by maturing American whiskey with rare oak from around the world. We’ve sourced our whiskey for these bottles from Kentucky and Indiana, and married each blend with oak barrel staves from all around the world: Japan for rare Mizunara oak; Scotland for peated Islay Scotch barrels; and Spain for aged amontillado sherry. Each barrel gives the whiskey a unique, rich, and complex taste and character not commonly found in American whiskey. Additionally, unlike Broken Barrel Whiskey’s core bourbon and rye, the Single Oak Series’ bases are all blends: Mizunara is a blend of five-year-old Kentucky and four-year-old Indiana corn whiskeys; Isle of Peat is a blend of American wheat and single-malt whiskeys; and The Cask of Amontillado is a blend of 12-year-old American whiskey and five-year-old Kentucky corn whiskey. The result is a synthesis nowhere to be found with traditional whiskey, and luckily, the project has paid off tremendously. The Single Oak Series has already won a few authoritative awards. At this year’s San Francisco World Spirits Competition, Isle of Peat received a Double Gold Medal in the Wheat Whisk(e)y category and Cask of Amontillado took home a Silver Medal in the Other Whisk(e)y category.

All three limited-edition expressions will be available nationwide in September 2019.

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2019/09/infuse-spirits-rebrands-whiskey-brand-under-new-name-broken-barrel-whiskey-commencing-with-the-limited-edition-single-oak-series-american-whiskey-news/

Infuse Spirits Rebrands Whiskey Brand Under New Name “Broken Barrel Whiskey,” Commencing with the Limited-Edition Single Oak Series – American Whiskey News

Infuse Spirits Rebrands Whiskey Brand Under New Name “Broken Barrel Whiskey,” Commencing with the Limited-Edition Single Oak Series

Infuse Spirits Group L.L.C., the first and only single-bottle infusion company and the spirit industry’s most popular craft infusion company, is excited to announce the rebranding of its whiskey line under the aptly named Broken Barrel Whiskey Co.

When Infuse Spirits first expanded its portfolio to include a Kentucky Bourbon called Broken Barrel, followed by the gold-medal winning Heresy Rye Whiskey, both delivered a message and method that became instantly discernible from Infuse’s vodkas and bitters. Whereas Infuse Spirits continues to steep its ingredients in the single-bottle infusions, Broken Barrel finishes and matures it’s whiskey with French Oak, ex-bourbon, and sherry cask staves in tanks before straining and bottling. This not only separates the two brands by process and style but illustrates how Broken Barrel Whiskey is unapologetically different from other whiskeys. Similar to a mash bill and equally as important, the company’s coined process called the Oak Bill—the selection of various oak barrel staves used to finish our products—is what defines the whiskey.

In this way, “the whiskeys follow their own path and seek to create a name for themselves by adhering to principles of originality, boundary-crossing, and unapologetic authenticity. By adding the barrel to the whiskey, not the whiskey to the barrel concept, we have created something different,” says Founder and Creator Seth Benhaim. If you are a collector, feel free to snag the fleeting designs of the “Infuse Spirits” titled whiskeys, as these will be discontinued and likely gone by early 2020, if not sooner! However, Broken Barrel Whiskey’s core products, Broken Barrel Bourbon and Heresy Rye, will not change price or recipes—they’ll remain the same as everyone knows and loves them.

So, now, the question: how does a rule-breaking producer continue to push the envelope? The limited-edition Single Oak Series is Broken Barrel Whiskey’s latest innovation. Under the new brand name, the company is releasing one-of-a-kind, limited bottlings of its Single Oak Series, which will offer three distinct expressions of oak-infused whiskey—Mizunara (50 ABV, 750 ml); Isle Of Peat (50 ABV, 750 ml); and Cask Of Amontillado (55 ABV, 750 ml)—with a suggested retail price of $50.

As Seth explains, “We deliver one-of-a-kind collaborations by maturing American whiskey with rare oak from around the world. We’ve sourced our whiskey for these bottles from Kentucky and Indiana, and married each blend with oak barrel staves from all around the world: Japan for rare Mizunara oak; Scotland for peated Islay Scotch barrels; and Spain for aged amontillado sherry. Each barrel gives the whiskey a unique, rich, and complex taste and character not commonly found in American whiskey. Additionally, unlike Broken Barrel Whiskey’s core bourbon and rye, the Single Oak Series’ bases are all blends: Mizunara is a blend of five-year-old Kentucky and four-year-old Indiana corn whiskeys; Isle of Peat is a blend of American wheat and single-malt whiskeys; and The Cask of Amontillado is a blend of 12-year-old American whiskey and five-year-old Kentucky corn whiskey. The result is a synthesis nowhere to be found with traditional whiskey, and luckily, the project has paid off tremendously. The Single Oak Series has already won a few authoritative awards. At this year’s San Francisco World Spirits Competition, Isle of Peat received a Double Gold Medal in the Wheat Whisk(e)y category and Cask of Amontillado took home a Silver Medal in the Other Whisk(e)y category.

All three limited-edition expressions will be available nationwide in September 2019.

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2019/09/infuse-spirits-rebrands-whiskey-brand-under-new-name-broken-barrel-whiskey-commencing-with-the-limited-edition-single-oak-series-american-whiskey-news/

Glen Moray 1989 (Asta Morris)

The latest release in the Asta Morris range is a Glen Moray 1989. I tried a cask sample of this whisky a couple of months ago, and I was immediately convinced.

 

 

Glen Moray 1989 - Asta MorrisGlen Moray 1989 - Asta MorrisGlen Moray 29 yo 1989 (53,2%, Asta Morris 2019, ex-bourbon cask, 204 btl.)

Nose: fresh and full of orchard fruits, with secondary notes of apricots and guava. Juicy with a slightly floral edge (orange blossom). Lots of polished oak, manuka honey and a little sunflower oil. Mouth: mirabelles, lime and pear, as well as a little coconut liqueur. Mixed with some cinnamon and vanilla this makes it quite bourbonny, as in American whiskey-like (without the sweetness). Aromatic wood, hints of ginger and pepper. Still some honey. Finish: long, with fruit tea, barley sugar, lime and wildflowers.

Super good, fruity Glen Moray with nice traces of actual bourbon. Totally my style. Around € 240, being distributed to stores as we speak.

Score: 90/100

Article source: https://www.whiskynotes.be/2019/glen-moray/glen-moray-1989-asta-morris/

New Scotch from Glenrothes Black Gold at The Whisky Barrel – Scotch Whisky News

Glenrothes 22 Year Old Black Gold

1997 Vintage Black Gold Sherry Butt

We’ve secured a few more bottles of the single sherry puncheon bottled April 2019 by Morrison MacKay for the Carn Mor Celebration of the Cask Black Gold series. Rich, sweet sherry cask matured Speyside single malt.

Glenrothes Distillery was established in the narrow valley of the Rothes Burn on the west side of Rothes in the Speyside whisky region by James Stuart Co. in 1878. This is a large malt whiskey distillery owned by Berry Bros Rudd of London, with eighteen washbacks, ten copper stills singing in their own mighty cathedral and has retained its traditional pagoda roof. Popular distillery releases include Glenrothes 1995, 1998 and Glenrothes Peated.

SHOP GLENROTHES 22 YEAR OLD- $234.24

 

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2019/09/new-scotch-from-glenrothes-black-gold-at-the-whisky-barrel-scotch-whisky-news/

New Scotch from Glenrothes Black Gold at The Whisky Barrel – Scotch Whisky News

Glenrothes 22 Year Old Black Gold

1997 Vintage Black Gold Sherry Butt

We’ve secured a few more bottles of the single sherry puncheon bottled April 2019 by Morrison MacKay for the Carn Mor Celebration of the Cask Black Gold series. Rich, sweet sherry cask matured Speyside single malt.

Glenrothes Distillery was established in the narrow valley of the Rothes Burn on the west side of Rothes in the Speyside whisky region by James Stuart Co. in 1878. This is a large malt whiskey distillery owned by Berry Bros Rudd of London, with eighteen washbacks, ten copper stills singing in their own mighty cathedral and has retained its traditional pagoda roof. Popular distillery releases include Glenrothes 1995, 1998 and Glenrothes Peated.

SHOP GLENROTHES 22 YEAR OLD- $234.24

 

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2019/09/new-scotch-from-glenrothes-black-gold-at-the-whisky-barrel-scotch-whisky-news/

The Whisky Exchange “Casks – a glossary of terms” – Whisky News

Casks – a glossary of terms

There are lots of technical terms bandied around when talking about casks. This list will demystify some of them.

Amburana – a South American hardwood, occasionally used for maturing cachaça and very occasionally for maturing whiskey. It imparts a distinctive tonka-bean flavour, combining vanilla, coconut and cherries.

American Oak – an oak native to America, Most commonly used to mature American whiskey when new, but reused to age and rest many other spirits around the world. Also known as Quercus Alba.

American Standard Barrel – a 200 litre cask.

Angel’s Share – the spirit that evaporates from cask while it is maturing.

Barrel – strictly speaking, an abbreviation of American Standard Barrel, but often used (inaccurately) to refer to any type of cask.

Bilge – the bulging section around the waist of a cask.

Blood tub – a 30-50 litre cask

Bung – a piece of wood (or occasionally rubber) used to seal the hole in a cask

Bung cloth – a piece of hessian wrapped around a bung before it is inserted into the bung hole. It makes it easier to extract the bung and also helps keep the seal liquid tight

Bung extractor – a tool used to pull out bungs. It is screwed into the wood of the bung and then pulled to extract it.

Bung hole – the hole drilled out of the bilge or head to allow filling and emptying.

Bung stave – a stave with a bung hole drilled into it.

Butt – a 500 litre cask.

Casks being charred at Loch Lomond distillery

Char – the burnt top layer on the inside of many casks, which acts as a filter during maturation.

Chinkapin – a type of American white oak with scientific name Quercus Muehlenbergii. It is very rarely used in whiskey maturation.

Croze – the groove on the inside of a cask at top and bottom that the head slots into.

Dechar/Rechar – a cask that has had the layer of char scrapped off before being recharred. This rejuvenates the cask, exposing new wood to the spirit that is filled into the cask.

Dunnage warehouse – a traditional warehouse where casks are stored on the sides, racked on top of each other.

European Oak – a term that encompasses a number of different oak species, but is generally used to refer to Quercus Robur. The flavour characteristics of casks made from European oak vary widely depending on the provenance of the wood.

First fill – a cask that has been used once before and has been refilled.

Head – the circular section at the top and bottom of a cask.

Hogshead – a 230-250 litre cask. Often made by adding extra staves to an American Standard Barrel.

Hoop – a band of metal that holds a cask together.

Mizunara – a species of oak that is found in Japan and north-eastern Asia. Also called Quercus Mongolica.

Octave – a 50 litre cask

Palletised warehousing. The stacks often go much higher

Palletised warehouse – a warehouse where casks are stored on their ends, stacked on pallets which themselves are stacked on top of each other.

Paxarette – a concentrated wine used for flavouring and colouring. It was often used to season sherry casks, giving them a punchy of sherry flavour. However, the practise has been against Scotch whisky regulations since the late 1980s/early 1990s.

Pièce – a 205 litre cask most-often used in French wine-making.

Pipe – a cask used for maturing port. 350+ litres in size, and usually closer to 500 litres.

Quarter cask – a 125 litre cask, one quarter of a butt.

Quarter-sawn – a method of breaking down a log such a way that the grain is more vertical through the planks. It increases the strength of the planks and allows more grain contact when they are made into casks.

Quercus Alba – the scientific name of American white oak.

Quercus Mongolica – the scientific name for Mizunara.

Quercus Robur – the scientific name of the most common type European oak.

Racked warehouse – a warehouse with shelves for storing casks on their sides.

Reed – a piece of material (traditionally dried reeds) pressed between the head and the croze to make a cask water-tight at the ends.

Refill cask – a cask that has been used to store spirit at least twice: first as virgin oak, then as first-fill then as refill.

Rejuvenated cask – another term for dechar/rechar.

Seasoned cask – casks that have had another liquid stored in them specifically to infuse the wood with some of the characteristics of that liquid.

Seasoning – the process of drying a piece of wood to make it more suitable for use as in building a cask.

Shave/Toast/Rechar aka STR – a process similar to dechar/rechar where a cask has a small amount of wood removed from the inside of the cask to reveal more active wood, which is then toasted and recharred. A method pioneered by the late Dr Jim Swan.

A solera. Image courtest of SherryNotes

Solera – in sherry, a system of continuous fractional blending where a notional row of casks is combined by occasionally drawing some sherry from the final cask, leaving the cask still with liquid in, and then refilling it from the previous cask in the row. That cask is refilled from the previous one and so on until the first in the row, which is refilled with new sherry. In whisky, it often refers to a single vat from which a whisky to be bottled is drawn, without emptying the vat, before being refilled with a new batch of the same whisky.

Stave – one of the pieces of wood that make up the sides of a cask.

Sulphur stick – a stick of sulphur burnt inside a cask to disinfect it before filling. No longer commonly used, but some older casks still have a sulphuric note from their earlier use. Much hated by whisky-writer Jim Murray.

Toast – the process of heating the staves of a cask, activating the flavour compounds within and helping them bend into the shape.

Tun – a large vat used for marrying multiple casks.

Valinch – a long, tapered tube used for extracting whisky from a cask. The valinch is inserted through the bung hole and allowed to fill. The user then place their finger over the hole at the end, stopping air from getting into the tube, and the valinch is removed. As air can’t get in the end, the whiskey (mostly) stays in the tube, allowing it to be poured into a glass.

Virgin oak – oak that has not been exposed to a spirit before; a first-use cask.

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2019/09/the-whisky-exchange-casks-a-glossary-of-terms-whisky-news/

The Whisky Exchange “Casks – a glossary of terms” – Whisky News

Casks – a glossary of terms

There are lots of technical terms bandied around when talking about casks. This list will demystify some of them.

Amburana – a South American hardwood, occasionally used for maturing cachaça and very occasionally for maturing whiskey. It imparts a distinctive tonka-bean flavour, combining vanilla, coconut and cherries.

American Oak – an oak native to America, Most commonly used to mature American whiskey when new, but reused to age and rest many other spirits around the world. Also known as Quercus Alba.

American Standard Barrel – a 200 litre cask.

Angel’s Share – the spirit that evaporates from cask while it is maturing.

Barrel – strictly speaking, an abbreviation of American Standard Barrel, but often used (inaccurately) to refer to any type of cask.

Bilge – the bulging section around the waist of a cask.

Blood tub – a 30-50 litre cask

Bung – a piece of wood (or occasionally rubber) used to seal the hole in a cask

Bung cloth – a piece of hessian wrapped around a bung before it is inserted into the bung hole. It makes it easier to extract the bung and also helps keep the seal liquid tight

Bung extractor – a tool used to pull out bungs. It is screwed into the wood of the bung and then pulled to extract it.

Bung hole – the hole drilled out of the bilge or head to allow filling and emptying.

Bung stave – a stave with a bung hole drilled into it.

Butt – a 500 litre cask.

Casks being charred at Loch Lomond distillery

Char – the burnt top layer on the inside of many casks, which acts as a filter during maturation.

Chinkapin – a type of American white oak with scientific name Quercus Muehlenbergii. It is very rarely used in whiskey maturation.

Croze – the groove on the inside of a cask at top and bottom that the head slots into.

Dechar/Rechar – a cask that has had the layer of char scrapped off before being recharred. This rejuvenates the cask, exposing new wood to the spirit that is filled into the cask.

Dunnage warehouse – a traditional warehouse where casks are stored on the sides, racked on top of each other.

European Oak – a term that encompasses a number of different oak species, but is generally used to refer to Quercus Robur. The flavour characteristics of casks made from European oak vary widely depending on the provenance of the wood.

First fill – a cask that has been used once before and has been refilled.

Head – the circular section at the top and bottom of a cask.

Hogshead – a 230-250 litre cask. Often made by adding extra staves to an American Standard Barrel.

Hoop – a band of metal that holds a cask together.

Mizunara – a species of oak that is found in Japan and north-eastern Asia. Also called Quercus Mongolica.

Octave – a 50 litre cask

Palletised warehousing. The stacks often go much higher

Palletised warehouse – a warehouse where casks are stored on their ends, stacked on pallets which themselves are stacked on top of each other.

Paxarette – a concentrated wine used for flavouring and colouring. It was often used to season sherry casks, giving them a punchy of sherry flavour. However, the practise has been against Scotch whisky regulations since the late 1980s/early 1990s.

Pièce – a 205 litre cask most-often used in French wine-making.

Pipe – a cask used for maturing port. 350+ litres in size, and usually closer to 500 litres.

Quarter cask – a 125 litre cask, one quarter of a butt.

Quarter-sawn – a method of breaking down a log such a way that the grain is more vertical through the planks. It increases the strength of the planks and allows more grain contact when they are made into casks.

Quercus Alba – the scientific name of American white oak.

Quercus Mongolica – the scientific name for Mizunara.

Quercus Robur – the scientific name of the most common type European oak.

Racked warehouse – a warehouse with shelves for storing casks on their sides.

Reed – a piece of material (traditionally dried reeds) pressed between the head and the croze to make a cask water-tight at the ends.

Refill cask – a cask that has been used to store spirit at least twice: first as virgin oak, then as first-fill then as refill.

Rejuvenated cask – another term for dechar/rechar.

Seasoned cask – casks that have had another liquid stored in them specifically to infuse the wood with some of the characteristics of that liquid.

Seasoning – the process of drying a piece of wood to make it more suitable for use as in building a cask.

Shave/Toast/Rechar aka STR – a process similar to dechar/rechar where a cask has a small amount of wood removed from the inside of the cask to reveal more active wood, which is then toasted and recharred. A method pioneered by the late Dr Jim Swan.

A solera. Image courtest of SherryNotes

Solera – in sherry, a system of continuous fractional blending where a notional row of casks is combined by occasionally drawing some sherry from the final cask, leaving the cask still with liquid in, and then refilling it from the previous cask in the row. That cask is refilled from the previous one and so on until the first in the row, which is refilled with new sherry. In whisky, it often refers to a single vat from which a whisky to be bottled is drawn, without emptying the vat, before being refilled with a new batch of the same whisky.

Stave – one of the pieces of wood that make up the sides of a cask.

Sulphur stick – a stick of sulphur burnt inside a cask to disinfect it before filling. No longer commonly used, but some older casks still have a sulphuric note from their earlier use. Much hated by whisky-writer Jim Murray.

Toast – the process of heating the staves of a cask, activating the flavour compounds within and helping them bend into the shape.

Tun – a large vat used for marrying multiple casks.

Valinch – a long, tapered tube used for extracting whisky from a cask. The valinch is inserted through the bung hole and allowed to fill. The user then place their finger over the hole at the end, stopping air from getting into the tube, and the valinch is removed. As air can’t get in the end, the whiskey (mostly) stays in the tube, allowing it to be poured into a glass.

Virgin oak – oak that has not been exposed to a spirit before; a first-use cask.

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2019/09/the-whisky-exchange-casks-a-glossary-of-terms-whisky-news/

JAMESON DISTILLERY SETS OFF ON WORLD TOUR – Irish Whiskey News

JAMESON DISTILLERY SETS OFF ON WORLD TOUR

Jameson Distillery Bow St. is touring the world, first stop, LX Factory in Lisbon, Portugal in September

Visitors to the pop-up will experience the history, heritage, production process and taste of Jameson on the definitive tour in Lisbon

Dublin, 1 September 2019: Irish Distillers, producer of some of the world’s best known and successful Irish whiskeys, has announced that its award-winning Bow St. Experience is going on tour. From September 2019, the experience will activate in Lisbon, Portugal. Jameson has created a replica of its flagship experience and shipped it to the Portuguese capital, bringing the home of the brand to new audiences.

Running throughout September at Lisbon’s creative urban district – LX Factory – visitors to the pop-up will experience the history, heritage, production process and taste of Jameson on the definitive tour, guided by Jameson’s world-renowned brand ambassadors. In addition, the surrounding Jameson Village will offer a range of interactive, fun and engaging experiences and live entertainment; including bartender masterclasses, a tattoo studio and a barber shop for tourists and visitors to enjoy.

Simon Fay, Business Acceleration Director at Irish Distillers, commented: “For years, we have welcomed Irish whiskey fans from around the world to our brand homes in Dublin and Cork to engage with our whiskeys through unique shared experiences. Now, we are incredibly excited to show Bow St, the spiritual home of Jameson, to the world. Innovation is central to everything we do at Irish Distillers, so we are thrilled to bring our home on tour using shipping containers to transport and house our Bow St. Experience around the globe.

Our aim is to bring our guests on a journey, engaging all five senses through audio visual story telling from a Jameson Brand Ambassador, aromas, hands-on experiences and, of course, product sampling.

This exciting project is part of Irish Distillers’ long-term brand experience plan. As a member of the Irish Whiskey Association, we’re working to make Ireland the world leader in whiskey tourism by 2030. Following on from the launch of Jameson Distillery On Tour this month, we hope to continue to bring the experience to life in other cities, reaching more audiences around the world,” he added.

Each tour lasts 30 minutes with visitors given the opportunity to try a range of Jameson cocktails and beer pairings before or after the tour at The Jameson Bar. Visitors will also be able to visit the Jameson store where they can find exclusive products and merchandise, including their own personalised Jameson Distillery Edition bottle, which until now, was only available at Jameson Distillery Bow St. in Dublin and Jameson Distillery Midleton in Cork.

In December 2018, Jameson Distillery Bow St. was named the World’s Leading Distillery Tour at the World Travel Awards. Jameson Distillery Bow St. was awarded Europe’s Leading Distillery Tour for the second year in a row at The World Travel Awards Europe Gala Ceremony 2019, held in Madeira in June.

About Irish Distillers

Irish Distillers is Ireland’s leading supplier of spirits and wines, and producer of some of the world’s most well-known and successful Irish whiskeys. Led by Jameson, our brands are driving the global renaissance of Irish whiskey. Jameson is the world’s fastest-growing Irish whiskey, experiencing 30 years of consecutive growth and hitting sales of 7.7m cases in 2018/19. Our brands are exported to 130+ markets, with over 70 of those experiencing double or triple-digit growth.

Irish Distillers was formed in 1966, when a merger took place between John Power Son, John Jameson Son and Cork Distilleries Company. In 1988 Irish Distillers joined Pernod Ricard, gaining access to unprecedented levels of investment and an extensive global distribution network. Since 2012, we have invested over €400 million to double our production and bottling capacity to meet global demand for our products.

We employ over 600 people across our operations in Cork and Dublin.

About Pernod Ricard

Pernod Ricard is the world’s n°2 in wines and spirits with consolidated Sales of €8,987 million in FY18. Created in 1975 by the merger of Ricard and Pernod, the Group has undergone sustained development, based on both organic growth and acquisitions: Seagram (2001), Allied Domecq (2005) and VinSprit (2008). Pernod Ricard holds one of the most prestigious brand portfolios in the sector: Absolut Vodka, Ricard pastis, Ballantine’s, Chivas Regal, Royal Salute and The Glenlivet Scotch whiskies, Jameson Irish whiskey, Martell cognac, Havana Club rum, Beefeater gin, Malibu liqueur, Mumm and Perrier-Jouët champagnes, as well Jacob’s Creek, Brancott Estate, Campo Viejo and Kenwood wines. Pernod Ricard employs a workforce of approximately 18,900 people and operates through a decentralised organisation, with 6 “Brand Companies” and 86 “Market Companies” established in each key market. Pernod Ricard is strongly committed to a sustainable development policy and encourages responsible consumption. Pernod Ricard’s strategy and ambition are based on 3 key values that guide its expansion: entrepreneurial spirit, mutual trust and a strong sense of ethics.

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2019/09/jameson-distillery-sets-off-on-world-tour-irish-whiskey-news/

JAMESON DISTILLERY SETS OFF ON WORLD TOUR – Irish Whiskey News

JAMESON DISTILLERY SETS OFF ON WORLD TOUR

Jameson Distillery Bow St. is touring the world, first stop, LX Factory in Lisbon, Portugal in September

Visitors to the pop-up will experience the history, heritage, production process and taste of Jameson on the definitive tour in Lisbon

Dublin, 1 September 2019: Irish Distillers, producer of some of the world’s best known and successful Irish whiskeys, has announced that its award-winning Bow St. Experience is going on tour. From September 2019, the experience will activate in Lisbon, Portugal. Jameson has created a replica of its flagship experience and shipped it to the Portuguese capital, bringing the home of the brand to new audiences.

Running throughout September at Lisbon’s creative urban district – LX Factory – visitors to the pop-up will experience the history, heritage, production process and taste of Jameson on the definitive tour, guided by Jameson’s world-renowned brand ambassadors. In addition, the surrounding Jameson Village will offer a range of interactive, fun and engaging experiences and live entertainment; including bartender masterclasses, a tattoo studio and a barber shop for tourists and visitors to enjoy.

Simon Fay, Business Acceleration Director at Irish Distillers, commented: “For years, we have welcomed Irish whiskey fans from around the world to our brand homes in Dublin and Cork to engage with our whiskeys through unique shared experiences. Now, we are incredibly excited to show Bow St, the spiritual home of Jameson, to the world. Innovation is central to everything we do at Irish Distillers, so we are thrilled to bring our home on tour using shipping containers to transport and house our Bow St. Experience around the globe.

Our aim is to bring our guests on a journey, engaging all five senses through audio visual story telling from a Jameson Brand Ambassador, aromas, hands-on experiences and, of course, product sampling.

This exciting project is part of Irish Distillers’ long-term brand experience plan. As a member of the Irish Whiskey Association, we’re working to make Ireland the world leader in whiskey tourism by 2030. Following on from the launch of Jameson Distillery On Tour this month, we hope to continue to bring the experience to life in other cities, reaching more audiences around the world,” he added.

Each tour lasts 30 minutes with visitors given the opportunity to try a range of Jameson cocktails and beer pairings before or after the tour at The Jameson Bar. Visitors will also be able to visit the Jameson store where they can find exclusive products and merchandise, including their own personalised Jameson Distillery Edition bottle, which until now, was only available at Jameson Distillery Bow St. in Dublin and Jameson Distillery Midleton in Cork.

In December 2018, Jameson Distillery Bow St. was named the World’s Leading Distillery Tour at the World Travel Awards. Jameson Distillery Bow St. was awarded Europe’s Leading Distillery Tour for the second year in a row at The World Travel Awards Europe Gala Ceremony 2019, held in Madeira in June.

About Irish Distillers

Irish Distillers is Ireland’s leading supplier of spirits and wines, and producer of some of the world’s most well-known and successful Irish whiskeys. Led by Jameson, our brands are driving the global renaissance of Irish whiskey. Jameson is the world’s fastest-growing Irish whiskey, experiencing 30 years of consecutive growth and hitting sales of 7.7m cases in 2018/19. Our brands are exported to 130+ markets, with over 70 of those experiencing double or triple-digit growth.

Irish Distillers was formed in 1966, when a merger took place between John Power Son, John Jameson Son and Cork Distilleries Company. In 1988 Irish Distillers joined Pernod Ricard, gaining access to unprecedented levels of investment and an extensive global distribution network. Since 2012, we have invested over €400 million to double our production and bottling capacity to meet global demand for our products.

We employ over 600 people across our operations in Cork and Dublin.

About Pernod Ricard

Pernod Ricard is the world’s n°2 in wines and spirits with consolidated Sales of €8,987 million in FY18. Created in 1975 by the merger of Ricard and Pernod, the Group has undergone sustained development, based on both organic growth and acquisitions: Seagram (2001), Allied Domecq (2005) and VinSprit (2008). Pernod Ricard holds one of the most prestigious brand portfolios in the sector: Absolut Vodka, Ricard pastis, Ballantine’s, Chivas Regal, Royal Salute and The Glenlivet Scotch whiskies, Jameson Irish whiskey, Martell cognac, Havana Club rum, Beefeater gin, Malibu liqueur, Mumm and Perrier-Jouët champagnes, as well Jacob’s Creek, Brancott Estate, Campo Viejo and Kenwood wines. Pernod Ricard employs a workforce of approximately 18,900 people and operates through a decentralised organisation, with 6 “Brand Companies” and 86 “Market Companies” established in each key market. Pernod Ricard is strongly committed to a sustainable development policy and encourages responsible consumption. Pernod Ricard’s strategy and ambition are based on 3 key values that guide its expansion: entrepreneurial spirit, mutual trust and a strong sense of ethics.

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2019/09/jameson-distillery-sets-off-on-world-tour-irish-whiskey-news/

Sonoma Distilling Co Tasting at The Whisky Shop #SFO September 27th, 2019 – American Whiskey News

Friday September 27th 5-7PM: 

Local Whiskey:

 Sonoma Distilling Co 

Sonoma Co. Distillery, founded in 2010 in the heart of Sonoma County is California’s premier whiskey distillery. Their ‘grain-to-glass’ approach to whisky brings a hands on quality to every bottling, producing a delicious selection of bourbons and ryes.

Click Here to RSVP

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2019/09/sonoma-distilling-co-tasting-at-the-whisky-shop-sfo-september-27th-2019-american-whiskey-news/