Currach Single Malt Irish Whiskey – Irish Whiskey News

Origin Spirits Ireland Ltd, creators of Kalak Single Malt Vodka and Ornabrak Single Malt Gin are pioneers in avant-garde single malt spirits. Following the same ethos, Currach Single Malt Irish Whiskey is a true innovation in the whisk(e)y world, and the first whisk(e)y to be finished in seaweed charred casks – Currach’s first expression with Irish Atlantic Kombu Kelp will be released in March 2020. 

Currach Single Malt Irish Whiskey

Atlantic Kombu Cask 

A fusion of tradition and innovation, Currach Single Malt Irish Whiskey celebrates one of the oldest and most venerable boats in the world. The Currach was a vessel of knowledge that enabled the early Irish monks to explore distant lands while harvesting expertise. Handcrafted like the whiskey, these boats played a pivotal role in Irish life and commerce.  

Using the finest of Irish malted barley, this contemporary single malt whiskey is triple distilled before being aged in ex-bourbon casks and is then finished in unique seaweed charred virgin oak casks. It’s this perfect union of the Irish land and sea that creates a rich multi-layered whiskey with a delicate umami character. 

The story…. 

Currach Boat

The currach is the traditional Irish boat made from wicker, animal skins and tar. It is one of the oldest types of boat in the world, possibly going back to Neolithic times. It played a significant role in the development of human civilization, from the spread of farming to carrying early Christian saints all over Europe. It was said to be the vessel used by Irish monks to discover the world and bring back religious artefacts and foreign technology, such as the alembic, to Ireland. The currach was used to transport whiskey across the Irish sea to Scotland (first exports of Irish whiskey), and is still used today to harvest seaweed in Ireland.

Malted Barley

Irish malted barley is recognized as being the best in the world. The fertile soils and mild, oceanic climate of Southern Ireland make it an ideal place to grow malting barley. The barley is non-GMO and sourced from local farmers who utilize eco-friendly growing methods. This produces a crop unlike any other and, once malted, creates a unique taste profile and character indigenous to the Irish terroir.

Distillation

Distillation takes places in the tranquil West Cork town of Skibbereen, nestled along the Wild Atlantic Way. Here the Irish malted barley is milled, mashed and fermented. Using traditional Irish distillation techniques, it is then triple distilled in copper pot stills to create a smooth and flavorsome liquid. The single malt new make spirit is then filled into ex bourbon casks and aged. 

Seaweed

Sustainably hand harvested off the wild Atlantic coast of Co. Clare, the seaweed is 100 % naturally grown and organically certified. Kombu is located in the extreme lower part of the shore. It can be sustainably harvested during low spring tides throughout the year. Fourth Generation Seaweed Harvesters, The Talty Family ensure only the finest seaweeds are selected for Currach Single Malt Whiskey.

Mildly salty and subtly sweet, Kombu is rich in umami, the fifth human taste. It has been used as a stable food source and ingredient in European and Asian cuisine for over 2000 years.

Cask Charring

The Atlantic Kombu seaweed is traditionally charred in small batches inside virgin American oak casks to impart a delicate and uniform umami fragrance into the wood. Once ready, these casks are filled with single malt Irish whiskey and allow to finish for three months.  The result is a magical fusion of two terroirs – Land and sea. 

Patrick Shelley, Founder of Origin Spirits Ireland Ltd. said;

“With Kalak Single Malt Vodka and Ornabrak Single Malt Gin, we adopted an avant-garde approach to producing world class single malt spirits, using the best of Irish ingredients and our tradition of distilling. Each of our products share the same DNA – Irish malted barley and copper pot distilled”

“Our vision on Currach was to create a single malt Irish whiskey based on various elements of the Irish terroir. Our land produces some of the best malted barley in the world and our seas yield wonderful organic and sustainable seaweed. Never before have these two elements been brought together in a whiskey and we are proud that this is a world’s first”. The union of land sea has become the backbone of Currach, and gives it such a uniquely rich, multi layered and complex character 

Tasting notes

Colour:            Amber Gold

Nose:               Toffee and raisins with hints of almond, backed by a roasted kombu aroma.

Palate:            Arabic roast coffee fused with salted caramel and dark chocolate 

notes complemented by nutty, earthy, lightly smoked and umami undertones.

Finish:              Dark and rich flavours fade to leave a persistent and delicately sweet

maritime finish. 

RSP:                 55 €

Availability:     Online: www.celticwhiskeyshop.com, www.irishmalts.com

Leading independent retailers (Celtic Whiskey Shop, Mulligans, Bradley’s, Ardkeen, World Wide Wines) 

For further information, contact Patrick Shelley  pshelley@originspirits.ie or Stephen Randles stephen@originspirits.ie 

Social Media (Instagram, Facebook, Twitter) @currachwhiskey

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2020/04/currach-single-malt-irish-whiskey-irish-whiskey-news/

ISLE OF RAASAY DISTILLERY CALLS LAST ORDERS ON WHILE WE WAIT SINGLE MALT SERIES – Scotch Whisky News

ISLE OF RAASAY DISTILLERY CALLS LAST ORDERS ON

WHILE WE WAIT SINGLE MALT SERIES 

Isle of Raasay Distillery today unveiled the fifth and final instalment of its While We Wait single malt Scotch whisky series, ahead of the island’s highly anticipated inaugural Isle of Raasay Single Malt release later this year.

Raasay While We Wait – Last Orders ends the distillery’s five-year countdown towards the releasing of the first legal single malt Scotch Whisky from an island rooted in centuries of expertise.

The Last Orders release combines peated and unpeated spirit expressions to provide discerning whisky drinkers with an accurate representation of the tastes and flavour to expect from the Isle of Raasay’s inaugural spirit. Matured in bourbon barrels and finished in first and second fill Tuscan red wine French oak casks for 18 months, Last Orders imparts a bounty of dark fruit flavours and character. This lightly peated, fruity single malt offers smokiness on first nosing, a dry peatiness on the palate, and a dash of orange zest from the nose, with an oaky and buttery finish.

Co-founder Alasdair Day said: “This fifth and final release of our While We Wait series is a highly significant step forward for our distillery. Our team are constantly looking to push the boundaries of whisky making, exploring the effect that different finishes and casks have on the flavour profile, and this spirit is the perfect embodiment of our ethos.

Raasay While We Wait – Last Orders marks the last opportunity to purchase a piece of history, to be a part of our journey and to enjoy the final release of something we are very proud of as we look forward to bottling our inaugural Isle of Raasay Single Malt later this year.”

Isle of Raasay Distillery is one of Scotland’s newest, pioneering distilleries. Located between the Isle of Skye and Scotland’s spectacular west coast, Isle of Raasay Distillery’s vision is to create the finest Hebridean single malt Scotch whisky and fully immerse whisky lovers in the Raasay experience at its five-star visitor centre and Victorian guesthouse with spectacular views of Skye’s Cuillin peaks.

Raasay While We Wait: Last Orders is priced at £45 and available to purchase on raasaydistillery.com and Master of Malt. Customers can also pre-order the Inaugural Isle of Raasay Single Malt via https://raasaydistillery.com/product/raasay-single-malt-inaugural-release-70cl/

Raasay While We Wait Tasting Notes

Nose:
A welcome smokiness on first nosing, mixed with red berries, lemon and grassy notes. With more time; pear, tangerine and melon.

Palate:
Dry peatiness on the palate, mixed in with red wine notes. A good dash of orange zest from the nose.

Finish:
Oaky and buttery finish.

Food Pairings:
Pairs well with Sconser scallops, smoked salmon, game, grouse, woodcock, venison, creamy blue cheese, bacon, haggis.

About Raasay:

With its sweeping views of the Isle of Skye’s Cuillin peaks, stunning forest trails, secluded beaches, and iconic flat-topped peak offering dramatic views of Skye’s famous vistas, Raasay is best known as the birthplace of celebrated Gaelic poet, the late Sorley MacLean, and Queen Victoria’s first piper, Angus Mackay.

The Isle of Raasay Distillery is producing island single malt Scotch whisky.

  • Capacity: 188,000 LPA
  • Mash Tun: 1 Tonne
  • Washback Size: 6 x 5,000 L
  • Fermentation Time: up to 118 hours
  • Wash Still: 5,000 L
  • Spirit Still: 3,600 L
  • Maturation: All maturation takes place on the Isle of Raasay.

Raasay Distillery, Borodale House, Isle of Raasay, Kyle IV40 8PB raasaydistillery.com
Instagram/ Facebook: @raasaydistillery, Twitter: @RaasayWhisky

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2020/04/isle-of-raasay-distillery-calls-last-orders-on-while-we-wait-single-malt-series-scotch-whisky-news/

Ben Nevis 1996 (The Whisky Jury)

The Whisky Jury started with an excellent first bottling, a Ben Nevis 1995. Recently this was followed by an excellent Caol Ila 1983 and this Ben Nevis 1996.

 

 

Ben Nevis 1996 - The Whisky JuryBen Nevis 23 yo 1996 (51,6%, The Whisky Jury 2019, refill hogshead #1315, 260 btl.)

Nose: starts fresh and slightly more vertical and citrusy than the 1995, or so it seems. Lemons and lime. Over time there’s also pineapple. Growing wet chalky notes and lovely paraffin. A late hint of vanilla as well. Mouth: here as well, slightly more citrusy at first. Lemon peel, greengages, plenty of grapefruits, mixing with green tea. In a second wave there are more tropical fruits: yellow grapefruit becomes pink, flashes of pineapple and guava. It’s slightly less Irish though, if you know what I mean. A nice combination of fatty texture and bright citrus. Finish: long and minty, with waxy echoes and a herbal edge.

We really can’t get enough of these Ben Nevis expressions from 1995 and 1996. The Whisky Jury definitely selected excellent examples. I may have a personal preference towards the 1995 but this is equally tasty. And sold out, if I’m not mistaken.

Score: 90/100

Article source: https://www.whiskynotes.be/2020/ben-nevis/ben-nevis-1996-whisky-jury/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=ben-nevis-1996-whisky-jury

Springbank 2000 (The Whisky Kingdom)

On this label you have The Whisky Kingdom, Duckhammer, Friends With Drams and Kyoto Fine Wine and Spirits. And I was told to mention Wu Dram Clan which seems to be a subset, or the ensemble, but that name is not actually mentioned. Next time also list the name of your dogs and mothers in law, please!

You may remember them from a really good Highland Park 2003 and a cracking Springbank 1992. Now they present a Springbank 2000 from a (very light) sherry hogshead.

 

 

Springbank 2000 - Wu Dram ClamSpringbank 19 yo 2000 (50,8%, The Whisky Kingdom for Wu Dram Clan 2020, refill sherry hogshead #669, 249 btl.)

Nose: the greasy / earthy style, with shoe polish, hints of beach sand. Sheep wool. Ashy notes but very much in the background. There’s also quite a juicy fruit note, a mix of green apples, lemons and grapefruit. Mouth: rather vivid with a marked sharpness, a good acidity and green citrus peel, as well as dry herbal touches. Oysters with lemon and mint. The mineral and peaty side is bigger than the nose suggested. Chalk and woody notes go hand in hand. Finish: long, with leather, green pepper, walnuts and a faint vegetal side.

Really good, very chiseled Springbank. A great selection again. Originally around € 250 but already sold out, I believe.

Score: 90/100

Article source: https://www.whiskynotes.be/2020/springbank/springbank-2000-whisky-kingdom-wu-dram-clan/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=springbank-2000-whisky-kingdom-wu-dram-clan

Whisky Wednesday Closed Distilleries Part 1 – Scotch Whisky News

With all the bad stuff happening around the world, let’s open some long forgotten whiskies and enjoy! This is a series I hope to run for a while, taking you all through the tastes of closed distilleries! This video features: Glen Flagler 40%, 1970’s bottling – Only existing from 1965 to 1985, Glen Flagler is one of the shortest lived distilleries in Scottish history. A light and embracing lowland style that’s very reminiscent of current Daftmill bottles. Glenesk 40%, 1980’s bottling – A distillery with five different names in just under one hundred year history. Alluring and tropical on the nose and then, boom! This very staring and unusual aftertaste. Cheers!

https://youtu.be/AWsJWFyEwyU

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2020/04/whisky-wednesday-closed-distilleries-part-1-scotch-whisky-news/

Glenrothes 1966 (SV for Master of Malt)

I’m trying this Glenrothes 1966 from one of 500 miniature bottles that were filled for The Master of Malt in 1993. They also had 50 full-size bottles pictured below.

At the same time Signatory Vintage had another 580 bottles as part of its dumpy bottle range, so it’s clear they provided the cask.

 

 

Glenrothes 1966 - Signatory for Master of MaltGlenrothes 1966 - Signatory for Master of MaltGlenrothes 27 yo 1966 (51,3%, The Master of Malt 1993; sherry butt #13512, 580 + 50 btl. + 500 miniatures)

Nose: rich figs and dates, old rummy notes and raisins. Jammy fruits underneath, like raspberries and oranges. Plenty of polished oak. Just a hint of smoke and roast coffee beans. Sticky toffee pudding. Great old-style sherry. Mouth: sort of ‘cooked down’ whisky with a big bitter side mixed with dark fruits. Charred wood. Heavily infused herbal tea and Fernet Branca. Blackcurrants, walnut liqueur, liquorice and espresso. Heavy oak and molasses. Loads of character, but a little heavyweight perhaps. Finish: very long, with the dry sherry and herbal notes lasting long.

Very rich and deeply sherried Glenrothes in a full-bodied style. It has a good deal of wood influence though, including herbal and slightly bitter notes. Auction material.

Score: 91/100

Article source: https://www.whiskynotes.be/2020/glenrothes/glenrothes-1966-signatory-master-of-malt/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=glenrothes-1966-signatory-master-of-malt

Glenrothes 1966 (SV for Master of Malt)

I’m trying this Glenrothes 1966 from one of 500 miniature bottles that were filled for The Master of Malt in 1993. They also had 50 full-size bottles pictured below.

At the same time Signatory Vintage had another 580 bottles as part of its dumpy bottle range, so it’s clear they provided the cask.

 

 

Glenrothes 1966 - Signatory for Master of MaltGlenrothes 1966 - Signatory for Master of MaltGlenrothes 27 yo 1966 (51,3%, The Master of Malt 1993; sherry butt #13512, 580 + 50 btl. + 500 miniatures)

Nose: rich figs and dates, old rummy notes and raisins. Jammy fruits underneath, like raspberries and oranges. Plenty of polished oak. Just a hint of smoke and roast coffee beans. Sticky toffee pudding. Great old-style sherry. Mouth: sort of ‘cooked down’ whisky with a big bitter side mixed with dark fruits. Charred wood. Heavily infused herbal tea and Fernet Branca. Blackcurrants, walnut liqueur, liquorice and espresso. Heavy oak and molasses. Loads of character, but a little heavyweight perhaps. Finish: very long, with the dry sherry and herbal notes lasting long.

Very rich and deeply sherried Glenrothes in a full-bodied style. It has a good deal of wood influence though, including herbal and slightly bitter notes. Auction material.

Score: 91/100

Article source: https://www.whiskynotes.be/2020/glenrothes/glenrothes-1966-signatory-master-of-malt/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=glenrothes-1966-signatory-master-of-malt

The Singleton – Paragon of Time Collection at Hard to Find Whisky – Scotch Whisky News

The Singleton

Paragon of Time Collection

1964 · 53 Year Old

£26,400

ADD TO BASKET

A sensational release from The Singleton brand. Matured in a single hogshead cask and bottled at 40.6% abv, The Singleton of Dufftown 53 Year Old 1964 Vintage is the first in the whisky brand’s new Paragon of Time Collection.  This is a real rarity and a real collectors piece for those looking to add to their collection.

The 53 Year Old will be presented in a crystal decanter and housed in a wooden presentation case, with a piece of the original cask incorporated into the packaging.

The Singleton has also partnered with award-winning artist Cai Zhi Song to celebrate the release by creating a commemorative sculpture called Blossom. It surpasses the brand’s previous oldest release by some way.  Previously it was  the 40-year-old Glendullan single malt from the whisky’s Forgotten Drop series released in 2018.

The whisky is said to feature ‘scented hand-cream, rose water and exotic tropical and berry fruit’ notes on the nose, with ‘dried figs and a suggestion of toffee’ on the palate



Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2020/03/the-singleton-paragon-of-time-collection-at-hard-to-find-whisky-scotch-whisky-news/

Two Highly Anticipated Cask Strength Releases from Kaiyo — Mizunara Oak Aged Whisky at K&L California – Japanese Whisky News

New Exclusives from the Most Exciting Project in Japanese Whisky

NOTE: In accordance with local directives, our walk-in retail locations are currently closed. We have low cost and free delivery options available in ZIP codes where we can ship lawfully, including anywhere in California. We can also include any new or existing will call orders in your delivery batch. Choose local delivery at checkout to learn if you qualify.

We’ve featured several different bottlings from the Kaiyo brand in recent years, all of which have been exceptional and count among the most interesting (and delicious) expressions out of Japan that we’ve had the good fortune to taste. We are especially excited to feature two new exclusives that have been bottled at cask strength. These bottlings, as is standard for Kaiyo, have been aged in Mizunara oak and spent months in the hull of a ship while traversing the globe. It may sound like a lot of effort to put into a bottle of whisky, but the results are nothing short of spectacular. While many of the details behind this pair remain frustratingly scarce, what we do know is that they will satisfy one’s craving for the best in Japanese whisky, and at a very affordable price. Each possesses its own distinctive stamp, while offering a layered complexity only found in bottlings that cost three to four times the price. It goes without saying that these whiskies are very rare and are already causing a stir among collectors. If you’ve enjoyed Kaiyo in the past, then you simply must treat yourself to this breathtaking pair. For us, they represent the very pinnacle of Japanese whisky. Quantities will not last, so make sure to secure your bottles today.

Like so many Japanese whiskies that have come to the market in recent years, Kaiyo remains an enigma. It tastes delicious, there is a tantalizing background story to the brand, but the level of detail a whisky geek desires always seem in short supply. No matter, ultimately when the price is right and the whisky tastes great, we are here to pull the trigger. The two casks are similar in their story, but very different in the final profile. Both are Japanese in origin, presumably teaspooned malt from the same source. They were placed into Mizunara oak for nearly 7.5 years and then each made Kaiyo’s hallmark ocean voyage. The gentle rocking, salt air, temperature and humidity changes are all a part of the whisky’s story. Once they disembarked from their ship their stories diverge. Cask #541 sees a year long finishing in a refill hogshead barrel. This adds a bit of complexity to the profile yet preserves the Mizunara oak as the defining characteristic. It’s a masterclass in Mizunara. Over time in glass you can pick out a wide array of sweet tropical notes ranging from juicy fruits to toasty coconut and a cabinet full of exotic spices. At 56% ABV and unchillfiltered, there is power, weight, and texture to bolster what is otherwise an elegant and complex dram.

Kaiyo KL Exclusive Cask #541 Cask Strength Japanese Whisky (750ml) ($99.99)

Andrew Whiteley | KL Staff Member | Review Date: March 24, 2020

The first selection ever of a Kaiyo single cask. After 7.4 years in Mizunara oak, this beauty was transferred to a 2nd fill hogshead for a little mellowing. It’s chockablock full of vanilla, coconut, honey and sandalwood. The stylistic preference in Japan for whiskies that are balanced and nuanced is clearly present, but this is not a shy malt. The barley shines from the get go, but add a little water and it explodes. At 56% ABV it’s a robust and full throttle whiskey that screams of its time in Mizunara with its bold and spicy wood profile.

David Othenin-Girard | KL Staff Member | Review Date: March 24, 2020

The enigmatic and opaque Kaiyo whisky has become a staple on our shelves. It does a lot of things right in the very complicated Japanese whisky genre while maybe skirting some of the most obvious pitfalls. And I still have no information about what is actually in these bottles, but we can assume that these have been aged in Japanese Mizunara and are likely sourced from malt distilled in northern Japan (Hokkaido Sendai). And while these distilleries are some of the world’s finest, it is clearly the barrel who is the star of the show here. Interestingly, the two barrels we purchased (541 543) are pretty different despite having the same proof and specs on the bottle. This cask is the most quintessential expression of the flavors I’d expect from Mizunara. The nose is tight at first and needs a drop or two of water to open up. Now we get tons of sandalwood, ceremonial incense, plum wine, coconut husk. On the palate, tons of red cherry and big spice – cinnamon, clove, nutmeg etc. It’s long, bold and peppery. This one is really pretty intense, designed for those who like more intense flavors. Adding water doesn’t necessarily diminish that but adds some depth and sweetness.

Kaiyo KL Exclusive Cask #543 Cask Strength Japanese Whisky (750ml) ($99.99)

Cask #543 has a much more unique finishing than #541. After its ocean stint the whisky was transferred to a ruby port pipe for a year. The dark red fruited wine cask has lent a wide array of flavors to frame the initial Mizunara aging. Dark chocolate, dried dates, ripe currants, and sweet raisins all meld with the sandalwood and coconut of the oak. Unchillfiltered and bottled at 56% ABV.

Andrew Whiteley | KL Staff Member | Review Date: March 24, 2020

Like its sister cask, this comes from some of Kaiyo’s oldest stocks. After nearly seven and half years in Japanese Mizunara oak the whisky was transferred into a ruby port pipe for another year of finishing. The result is a spectacular array of red fruits and raisins to frame the spicy yet tropical flavors of Mizunara oak. The hallmark sandalwood notes are particularly persistent on the finish. It’s amazing how much power the famed Japanese wood carries into the spirit, and to see it with a unique finish that compliments it so well is a real treat. With a dash of water a much more complex array of red currants, dusty cocoa, and candied nuts come forward on the nose and palate. It’s as though that water is the key that unlocks the port pipe’s Mizunara cage.

David Othenin-Girard | KL Staff Member | Review Date: March 24, 2020

These wild casks of Japanese Mizunara Oak aged whisky have been are a bit of a mystery, but tasting them side by side is a really interesting experience. While cask 541 had tons of spice, this one has much more fruit. The nose starts with classic Mizunara plum spice, but melds into a complex bouquet of wild honey, baked apple, earthy malt and fresh oak. The softer nose doesn’t translate to the palate and we’ve still got that bold oak and spice from the Mizunara taking over. Yet here more subtlety, more malt and a bit more sweetness. There’s something that reminds me distinctively of Ben Nevis, which would be appropriate considering the assumed source. A very interesting offering indeed.

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2020/03/two-highly-anticipated-cask-strength-releases-from-kaiyo-mizunara-oak-aged-whisky-at-kl-california-japanese-whisky-news/

M&H Classic

Milk Honey, based in Tel Aviv, is probably the best known Israeli distillery, at least here in Europe. We’ve seen some limited expressions in the past couple of years and now they’ve launched MH Classic, the first commercial single malt bottling so to speak. Still limited availability but now on the shelves in Holland, France, UK, Germany, Austria and Poland. It has also been introduced in Belgium this month.

MH Classic is a combination of 80% ex-bourbon casks and 18% STR casks (red wine casks that are shaved, toasted, re-charred), as well as tiny portion of virgin oak casks. It is very young, between 3 and 4 years of age.

 

 

Milk  Honey ClassicMilk  Honey ClassicMilk Honey Classic
(46%, OB 2019, 10.000 btl.)

Nose: punchy start, including a boozy note. Some rather floral top notes, mixed with honey and fruits (the usual peach / apple combo). New furniture scents with vanilla and nutmeg. A faint whiff of red wine in the background. It’s assertive (good) but also a bit unbalanced. Mouth: better. The fruity notes are brighter (oranges, apples) with more honey. Of course there’s still a big oaky / spicy theme (green pepper, nutmeg, clove). Bready notes. Still a raw grainy side. Finish: medium, quite grassy and spicy.

So yes, this is really okay for a first wide-scale expression, but it’s too young and lacks some integration to recommend it. I would argue colder climates have better results with STR casks? Big progress though, I’m sure they’ll find a better balance in due time.

Score: 77/100

Article source: https://www.whiskynotes.be/2020/world/milk-and-honey-classic-whisky/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=milk-and-honey-classic-whisky