The Whisky Exchange “Casks – a glossary of terms” – Whisky News

Casks – a glossary of terms

There are lots of technical terms bandied around when talking about casks. This list will demystify some of them.

Amburana – a South American hardwood, occasionally used for maturing cachaça and very occasionally for maturing whiskey. It imparts a distinctive tonka-bean flavour, combining vanilla, coconut and cherries.

American Oak – an oak native to America, Most commonly used to mature American whiskey when new, but reused to age and rest many other spirits around the world. Also known as Quercus Alba.

American Standard Barrel – a 200 litre cask.

Angel’s Share – the spirit that evaporates from cask while it is maturing.

Barrel – strictly speaking, an abbreviation of American Standard Barrel, but often used (inaccurately) to refer to any type of cask.

Bilge – the bulging section around the waist of a cask.

Blood tub – a 30-50 litre cask

Bung – a piece of wood (or occasionally rubber) used to seal the hole in a cask

Bung cloth – a piece of hessian wrapped around a bung before it is inserted into the bung hole. It makes it easier to extract the bung and also helps keep the seal liquid tight

Bung extractor – a tool used to pull out bungs. It is screwed into the wood of the bung and then pulled to extract it.

Bung hole – the hole drilled out of the bilge or head to allow filling and emptying.

Bung stave – a stave with a bung hole drilled into it.

Butt – a 500 litre cask.

Casks being charred at Loch Lomond distillery

Char – the burnt top layer on the inside of many casks, which acts as a filter during maturation.

Chinkapin – a type of American white oak with scientific name Quercus Muehlenbergii. It is very rarely used in whiskey maturation.

Croze – the groove on the inside of a cask at top and bottom that the head slots into.

Dechar/Rechar – a cask that has had the layer of char scrapped off before being recharred. This rejuvenates the cask, exposing new wood to the spirit that is filled into the cask.

Dunnage warehouse – a traditional warehouse where casks are stored on the sides, racked on top of each other.

European Oak – a term that encompasses a number of different oak species, but is generally used to refer to Quercus Robur. The flavour characteristics of casks made from European oak vary widely depending on the provenance of the wood.

First fill – a cask that has been used once before and has been refilled.

Head – the circular section at the top and bottom of a cask.

Hogshead – a 230-250 litre cask. Often made by adding extra staves to an American Standard Barrel.

Hoop – a band of metal that holds a cask together.

Mizunara – a species of oak that is found in Japan and north-eastern Asia. Also called Quercus Mongolica.

Octave – a 50 litre cask

Palletised warehousing. The stacks often go much higher

Palletised warehouse – a warehouse where casks are stored on their ends, stacked on pallets which themselves are stacked on top of each other.

Paxarette – a concentrated wine used for flavouring and colouring. It was often used to season sherry casks, giving them a punchy of sherry flavour. However, the practise has been against Scotch whisky regulations since the late 1980s/early 1990s.

Pièce – a 205 litre cask most-often used in French wine-making.

Pipe – a cask used for maturing port. 350+ litres in size, and usually closer to 500 litres.

Quarter cask – a 125 litre cask, one quarter of a butt.

Quarter-sawn – a method of breaking down a log such a way that the grain is more vertical through the planks. It increases the strength of the planks and allows more grain contact when they are made into casks.

Quercus Alba – the scientific name of American white oak.

Quercus Mongolica – the scientific name for Mizunara.

Quercus Robur – the scientific name of the most common type European oak.

Racked warehouse – a warehouse with shelves for storing casks on their sides.

Reed – a piece of material (traditionally dried reeds) pressed between the head and the croze to make a cask water-tight at the ends.

Refill cask – a cask that has been used to store spirit at least twice: first as virgin oak, then as first-fill then as refill.

Rejuvenated cask – another term for dechar/rechar.

Seasoned cask – casks that have had another liquid stored in them specifically to infuse the wood with some of the characteristics of that liquid.

Seasoning – the process of drying a piece of wood to make it more suitable for use as in building a cask.

Shave/Toast/Rechar aka STR – a process similar to dechar/rechar where a cask has a small amount of wood removed from the inside of the cask to reveal more active wood, which is then toasted and recharred. A method pioneered by the late Dr Jim Swan.

A solera. Image courtest of SherryNotes

Solera – in sherry, a system of continuous fractional blending where a notional row of casks is combined by occasionally drawing some sherry from the final cask, leaving the cask still with liquid in, and then refilling it from the previous cask in the row. That cask is refilled from the previous one and so on until the first in the row, which is refilled with new sherry. In whisky, it often refers to a single vat from which a whisky to be bottled is drawn, without emptying the vat, before being refilled with a new batch of the same whisky.

Stave – one of the pieces of wood that make up the sides of a cask.

Sulphur stick – a stick of sulphur burnt inside a cask to disinfect it before filling. No longer commonly used, but some older casks still have a sulphuric note from their earlier use. Much hated by whisky-writer Jim Murray.

Toast – the process of heating the staves of a cask, activating the flavour compounds within and helping them bend into the shape.

Tun – a large vat used for marrying multiple casks.

Valinch – a long, tapered tube used for extracting whisky from a cask. The valinch is inserted through the bung hole and allowed to fill. The user then place their finger over the hole at the end, stopping air from getting into the tube, and the valinch is removed. As air can’t get in the end, the whiskey (mostly) stays in the tube, allowing it to be poured into a glass.

Virgin oak – oak that has not been exposed to a spirit before; a first-use cask.

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2019/09/the-whisky-exchange-casks-a-glossary-of-terms-whisky-news/

The Whisky Exchange “Casks – a glossary of terms” – Whisky News

Casks – a glossary of terms

There are lots of technical terms bandied around when talking about casks. This list will demystify some of them.

Amburana – a South American hardwood, occasionally used for maturing cachaça and very occasionally for maturing whiskey. It imparts a distinctive tonka-bean flavour, combining vanilla, coconut and cherries.

American Oak – an oak native to America, Most commonly used to mature American whiskey when new, but reused to age and rest many other spirits around the world. Also known as Quercus Alba.

American Standard Barrel – a 200 litre cask.

Angel’s Share – the spirit that evaporates from cask while it is maturing.

Barrel – strictly speaking, an abbreviation of American Standard Barrel, but often used (inaccurately) to refer to any type of cask.

Bilge – the bulging section around the waist of a cask.

Blood tub – a 30-50 litre cask

Bung – a piece of wood (or occasionally rubber) used to seal the hole in a cask

Bung cloth – a piece of hessian wrapped around a bung before it is inserted into the bung hole. It makes it easier to extract the bung and also helps keep the seal liquid tight

Bung extractor – a tool used to pull out bungs. It is screwed into the wood of the bung and then pulled to extract it.

Bung hole – the hole drilled out of the bilge or head to allow filling and emptying.

Bung stave – a stave with a bung hole drilled into it.

Butt – a 500 litre cask.

Casks being charred at Loch Lomond distillery

Char – the burnt top layer on the inside of many casks, which acts as a filter during maturation.

Chinkapin – a type of American white oak with scientific name Quercus Muehlenbergii. It is very rarely used in whiskey maturation.

Croze – the groove on the inside of a cask at top and bottom that the head slots into.

Dechar/Rechar – a cask that has had the layer of char scrapped off before being recharred. This rejuvenates the cask, exposing new wood to the spirit that is filled into the cask.

Dunnage warehouse – a traditional warehouse where casks are stored on the sides, racked on top of each other.

European Oak – a term that encompasses a number of different oak species, but is generally used to refer to Quercus Robur. The flavour characteristics of casks made from European oak vary widely depending on the provenance of the wood.

First fill – a cask that has been used once before and has been refilled.

Head – the circular section at the top and bottom of a cask.

Hogshead – a 230-250 litre cask. Often made by adding extra staves to an American Standard Barrel.

Hoop – a band of metal that holds a cask together.

Mizunara – a species of oak that is found in Japan and north-eastern Asia. Also called Quercus Mongolica.

Octave – a 50 litre cask

Palletised warehousing. The stacks often go much higher

Palletised warehouse – a warehouse where casks are stored on their ends, stacked on pallets which themselves are stacked on top of each other.

Paxarette – a concentrated wine used for flavouring and colouring. It was often used to season sherry casks, giving them a punchy of sherry flavour. However, the practise has been against Scotch whisky regulations since the late 1980s/early 1990s.

Pièce – a 205 litre cask most-often used in French wine-making.

Pipe – a cask used for maturing port. 350+ litres in size, and usually closer to 500 litres.

Quarter cask – a 125 litre cask, one quarter of a butt.

Quarter-sawn – a method of breaking down a log such a way that the grain is more vertical through the planks. It increases the strength of the planks and allows more grain contact when they are made into casks.

Quercus Alba – the scientific name of American white oak.

Quercus Mongolica – the scientific name for Mizunara.

Quercus Robur – the scientific name of the most common type European oak.

Racked warehouse – a warehouse with shelves for storing casks on their sides.

Reed – a piece of material (traditionally dried reeds) pressed between the head and the croze to make a cask water-tight at the ends.

Refill cask – a cask that has been used to store spirit at least twice: first as virgin oak, then as first-fill then as refill.

Rejuvenated cask – another term for dechar/rechar.

Seasoned cask – casks that have had another liquid stored in them specifically to infuse the wood with some of the characteristics of that liquid.

Seasoning – the process of drying a piece of wood to make it more suitable for use as in building a cask.

Shave/Toast/Rechar aka STR – a process similar to dechar/rechar where a cask has a small amount of wood removed from the inside of the cask to reveal more active wood, which is then toasted and recharred. A method pioneered by the late Dr Jim Swan.

A solera. Image courtest of SherryNotes

Solera – in sherry, a system of continuous fractional blending where a notional row of casks is combined by occasionally drawing some sherry from the final cask, leaving the cask still with liquid in, and then refilling it from the previous cask in the row. That cask is refilled from the previous one and so on until the first in the row, which is refilled with new sherry. In whisky, it often refers to a single vat from which a whisky to be bottled is drawn, without emptying the vat, before being refilled with a new batch of the same whisky.

Stave – one of the pieces of wood that make up the sides of a cask.

Sulphur stick – a stick of sulphur burnt inside a cask to disinfect it before filling. No longer commonly used, but some older casks still have a sulphuric note from their earlier use. Much hated by whisky-writer Jim Murray.

Toast – the process of heating the staves of a cask, activating the flavour compounds within and helping them bend into the shape.

Tun – a large vat used for marrying multiple casks.

Valinch – a long, tapered tube used for extracting whisky from a cask. The valinch is inserted through the bung hole and allowed to fill. The user then place their finger over the hole at the end, stopping air from getting into the tube, and the valinch is removed. As air can’t get in the end, the whiskey (mostly) stays in the tube, allowing it to be poured into a glass.

Virgin oak – oak that has not been exposed to a spirit before; a first-use cask.

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2019/09/the-whisky-exchange-casks-a-glossary-of-terms-whisky-news/

Sonoma Distilling Co Tasting at The Whisky Shop #SFO September 27th, 2019 – American Whiskey News

Friday September 27th 5-7PM: 

Local Whiskey:

 Sonoma Distilling Co 

Sonoma Co. Distillery, founded in 2010 in the heart of Sonoma County is California’s premier whiskey distillery. Their ‘grain-to-glass’ approach to whisky brings a hands on quality to every bottling, producing a delicious selection of bourbons and ryes.

Click Here to RSVP

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2019/09/sonoma-distilling-co-tasting-at-the-whisky-shop-sfo-september-27th-2019-american-whiskey-news/

Sonoma Distilling Co Tasting at The Whisky Shop #SFO September 27th, 2019 – American Whiskey News

Friday September 27th 5-7PM: 

Local Whiskey:

 Sonoma Distilling Co 

Sonoma Co. Distillery, founded in 2010 in the heart of Sonoma County is California’s premier whiskey distillery. Their ‘grain-to-glass’ approach to whisky brings a hands on quality to every bottling, producing a delicious selection of bourbons and ryes.

Click Here to RSVP

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2019/09/sonoma-distilling-co-tasting-at-the-whisky-shop-sfo-september-27th-2019-american-whiskey-news/

McKenzie Bottled-in-Bond Wheated Bourbon Whiskey – American Whiskey News

McKenzie Bottled-in-Bond Wheated Bourbon Whiskey (750ml) ($44.99)

One of New York state’s best craft distilleries delivers a masterpiece with a bottled in bond wheated bourbon. Situated on the east shore of Lake Seneca in the heart of the Finger Lakes wine country, McKenzie has always made their whiskies with locally sourced NY grain and dedicated themselves to environmental stewardship. They were a huge hit here at KL many years ago when they were brand new with baby aged whiskey. Today they’re better than ever. By law the bottled in bond is at least 4 years old, but the whiskey here is older than the legal minimum. The rich and creamy texture is perfect at 100 proof. With the sky high demand for wheated bourbon, I don’t expect us to be able to keep this in stock, but it would be unfair to compare it with Weller or Pappy. The real story here is in the curation of exceptionally high quality grains grown in the bread basket of New York. The distillation ends at a slightly lower proof to preserve more of the inherent wheat and corn flavors in the final product. The quality of the whiskey is superb. It’s dense, rich, smooth as silk, and wildly flavorful.

Andrew Whiteley | KL Staff Member | Review Date: June 05, 2019

The best wheated bourbon on our shelf. Full Stop. A few things are done differently at the Finger Lakes Distillery to make Mckenzie that contribute to it’s full and intense flavor. All of the grain is grown locally in New York state before being distilled to a lower than normal proof, retaining more flavor. The second distillation is carried out on a thumper, an old school technique given up for modern efficiency by most Kentucky producers. It is then barreled at a ridiculously low 100 proof in barrels made from 36 month air dried staves. The end result of these expensive choice is that you need to add almost no water when it comes time to bottle – yet again, the result is MORE flavor. Just ask Michter’s who barrels at 103 proof! Each of these production choices sets Mckenzie apart, but the true test comes down to what’s in the bottle. Pour a slug of this into a glass and let it sit for a moment. You won’t even have to nose the glass before you smell the rich caramel, brown sugar, dried fruits, and mellow grain wafting up. Put the liquid to your lips and the first thing you notice is the texture. It’s full bodied and creamy. The flavors expand across the palate as a repeat of the nose with the added complexity of cinnamon, nutmeg, and very gentle wood tannin. The finish flourishes into an array of pepper, cocoa, caramel, sweet tea, and caramelized sugar. The 100 proof ties every aspect together in harmony. A complete bourbon and an incredibly showing for the Burdett, NY distillery.

Stefanie Juelsgaard | KL Staff Member | Review Date: June 05, 2019

Could this be the best wheated Bourbon in the store? You need to try it to find out, but everyone at KL is on board with that statement. With some of the big names in wheated Bourbon, like Pappy and Weller, now impossible to come by, it’s really reassuring to know we can still find something of this incredible quality and taste available. It’s great to be able to support the craft distillers in this era of giant conglomerates and McKenzie’s attention to detail and dedication to this spirit is evident in this bottling. Not too shabby at all.

Neal Fischer | KL Staff Member | Review Date: June 04, 2019

A wheated Bourbon for all seasons! I normally gravitate toward high-rye American whiskeys, but I like this wheater because it’s no pushover. The nose begins with some of the more gentle scents one might expect from wheated Bourbon: breadiness, breakfast brioche, butter toffees, and baked fruits. However, this is not any old wheated Bourbon because it happens to be Bottled in Bond which ensures a decent level of maturity and 100 proof. Sandalwood pops out of the oak char notes and then the booze turns spicy (not into Rye territory, but enough to liven the glass). Clove begets allspice begets savory anise that reminds me of European black licorice candies. As the Bourbon ebbs to its long finish, the fruit flavors bob in and out between those spicy notes and polished wood tannins.

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2019/09/mckenzie-bottled-in-bond-wheated-bourbon-whiskey-american-whiskey-news/

McKenzie Bottled-in-Bond Wheated Bourbon Whiskey – American Whiskey News

McKenzie Bottled-in-Bond Wheated Bourbon Whiskey (750ml) ($44.99)

One of New York state’s best craft distilleries delivers a masterpiece with a bottled in bond wheated bourbon. Situated on the east shore of Lake Seneca in the heart of the Finger Lakes wine country, McKenzie has always made their whiskies with locally sourced NY grain and dedicated themselves to environmental stewardship. They were a huge hit here at KL many years ago when they were brand new with baby aged whiskey. Today they’re better than ever. By law the bottled in bond is at least 4 years old, but the whiskey here is older than the legal minimum. The rich and creamy texture is perfect at 100 proof. With the sky high demand for wheated bourbon, I don’t expect us to be able to keep this in stock, but it would be unfair to compare it with Weller or Pappy. The real story here is in the curation of exceptionally high quality grains grown in the bread basket of New York. The distillation ends at a slightly lower proof to preserve more of the inherent wheat and corn flavors in the final product. The quality of the whiskey is superb. It’s dense, rich, smooth as silk, and wildly flavorful.

Andrew Whiteley | KL Staff Member | Review Date: June 05, 2019

The best wheated bourbon on our shelf. Full Stop. A few things are done differently at the Finger Lakes Distillery to make Mckenzie that contribute to it’s full and intense flavor. All of the grain is grown locally in New York state before being distilled to a lower than normal proof, retaining more flavor. The second distillation is carried out on a thumper, an old school technique given up for modern efficiency by most Kentucky producers. It is then barreled at a ridiculously low 100 proof in barrels made from 36 month air dried staves. The end result of these expensive choice is that you need to add almost no water when it comes time to bottle – yet again, the result is MORE flavor. Just ask Michter’s who barrels at 103 proof! Each of these production choices sets Mckenzie apart, but the true test comes down to what’s in the bottle. Pour a slug of this into a glass and let it sit for a moment. You won’t even have to nose the glass before you smell the rich caramel, brown sugar, dried fruits, and mellow grain wafting up. Put the liquid to your lips and the first thing you notice is the texture. It’s full bodied and creamy. The flavors expand across the palate as a repeat of the nose with the added complexity of cinnamon, nutmeg, and very gentle wood tannin. The finish flourishes into an array of pepper, cocoa, caramel, sweet tea, and caramelized sugar. The 100 proof ties every aspect together in harmony. A complete bourbon and an incredibly showing for the Burdett, NY distillery.

Stefanie Juelsgaard | KL Staff Member | Review Date: June 05, 2019

Could this be the best wheated Bourbon in the store? You need to try it to find out, but everyone at KL is on board with that statement. With some of the big names in wheated Bourbon, like Pappy and Weller, now impossible to come by, it’s really reassuring to know we can still find something of this incredible quality and taste available. It’s great to be able to support the craft distillers in this era of giant conglomerates and McKenzie’s attention to detail and dedication to this spirit is evident in this bottling. Not too shabby at all.

Neal Fischer | KL Staff Member | Review Date: June 04, 2019

A wheated Bourbon for all seasons! I normally gravitate toward high-rye American whiskeys, but I like this wheater because it’s no pushover. The nose begins with some of the more gentle scents one might expect from wheated Bourbon: breadiness, breakfast brioche, butter toffees, and baked fruits. However, this is not any old wheated Bourbon because it happens to be Bottled in Bond which ensures a decent level of maturity and 100 proof. Sandalwood pops out of the oak char notes and then the booze turns spicy (not into Rye territory, but enough to liven the glass). Clove begets allspice begets savory anise that reminds me of European black licorice candies. As the Bourbon ebbs to its long finish, the fruit flavors bob in and out between those spicy notes and polished wood tannins.

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2019/09/mckenzie-bottled-in-bond-wheated-bourbon-whiskey-american-whiskey-news/

A. Smith Bowman Distillery Awarded Gold Medals, “Best of Category” Honor at 2019 Los Angeles International Spirits Competition – American Whiskey News

A.SMITH BOWMAN DISTILLERY AWARDED GOLD MEDALS,

“BEST OF CATEGORY” HONOR AT 2019 LOS ANGELES INTERNATIONAL SPIRITS COMPETITION

One spirit awarded Silver Medal

FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA (Aug. 29, 2019) – At this year’s Los Angeles International Spirits Competition, five A. Smith Bowman entries earned Gold Medals, and one, John J. Bowman Single Barrel Virginia Straight Bourbon, earned a Silver Medal.

Isaac Bowman Port Barrel Finished Virginia Straight Bourbon was named a “Best of Category Bourbon with a Unique Finish” and also was awarded a Gold Medal, earning 91 points.

Other A. Smith Bowman spirits winning Gold Medals were:

  • Bowman Brothers Small Batch Virginia Straight Bourbon (90 points)

This competition, in its thirteenth year, is judged by a panel of the spirit industry’s most renowned judges including award-winning authors, buyers, journalists, educators and bar owners, who rate each spirit on a 100-point scale.

Complete results for the 2019 Los Angeles International Spirits Competition can be found at https://fairplex.com/competitions/spirits-competition/awards-celebration.

About A. Smith Bowman

A. Smith Bowman’s distilling roots date back to the years before Prohibition when the Bowman family had a granary and dairy farm in Sunset Hills, Virginia. They used excess grain from the family estate to distill spirits. In 1934, after the Repeal of Prohibition, Abram Smith Bowman and his sons continued the family tradition and built a more modern distillery in Fairfax County, Virginia called Sunset Hills Farm.  The Distillery was moved in 1988 and is now nestled in Spotsylvania County near the city of Fredericksburg, 60 miles away from the original location.

As a small and privately owned company, A. Smith Bowman Distillery continues the time-honored traditions on which it was founded. Considered a micro-distillery by today’s standards, A. Smith Bowman produces an assortment of hand-crafted spirits distilled from only the finest natural ingredients and using the latest technology. This micro-distillery focuses on the production of premium spirits honoring the legacy of Virginia’s first settlers. Its various brands have won more than 100 awards in the past five years, including John J. Bowman Single Barrel, which received a gold medal at the 2019 San Francisco World Spirits Competition. For more information on A. Smith Bowman, please visit www.asmithbowman.com.

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2019/09/a-smith-bowman-distillery-awarded-gold-medals-best-of-category-honor-at-2019-los-angeles-international-spirits-competition-american-whiskey-news/

Interview met Alex Chasko, Master Distiller bij Teeling

Op 11 september 2019 kon ik, voorafgaand aan een geweldige VIP Masterclass, kennis maken met Alex Chasko, de Master Distiller Master Blender van de Ierse distilleerderij Teeling.

Deze Amerikaan, geboren en getogen in Oregon, is een indrukwekkende verschijning. Boomlang met een diepe baritonstem. Maar eens we over Teeling beginnen zie je de glinstering in zijn ogen en een brede glimlach verschijnt om zijn lippen. Dit is een gepassioneerd distilleerder. En naar eigen zeggen ook de eerste medewerker van Teeling (hij was er al bij toen Jack met het plan rondliep, maar nog voor diens broer Stephen er bij was gekomen).

Je bent de Master Distiller bij Teeling. Wat betekent dat eigenlijk?

‘Ik ben verantwoordelijk voor alle liquid in de Teeling Company, dus als je de fles, het label of de prijs van de whiskey niet goed vind… dat is iemand anders (lacht), maar als je de whiskey niet goed vind, dan is dat mijn schuld’.

Bovendien ben je ook de Master Blender.

‘Klopt. Ik ben dus ook verantwoordelijk voor de ontwikkeling van de whiskey, van het merk en het beheer van de bestaande stocks alsook het opbouwen van nieuwe stock en hoe we de distilleerderij verder kunnen laten ontwikkelen.’

Teeling is een nieuwe distilleerderij, gestart in 2012. Verbazingwekkend toch, als je weet dat het de eerste distilleerderij is die in Dublin werd neergepoot in meer dan 125 jaar.

‘Het was inderdaad een gek idee op dat moment.’

Vanwaar die vernieuwde interesse in Ierse whiskey in het algemeen en Teeling in het bijzonder?

‘Ik denk dat category leader Jameson voor een groot stuk aan de basis van het succes van Ierse whiskey ligt, net als enkele andere grote spelers als Bacardi en Seagram’s. Wij bij Teeling willen graag ons steentje bijdragen en iets nieuws op de markt brengen.’

‘Het openen van de Cooley Distillery in 1987 was ook een key moment voor de hernieuwde interesse voor Ierse whiskey. Er zijn ook verschillende multinationals naar Ierland gekomen om bestaande merken te kopen en nieuwe distilleerderijprojecten op te starten. Er is ook duidelijk een grotere interesse in brown spirits in het algemeen.’

‘Ierse whiskey is erg licht en toegankelijk en zoet van nature en leent zich erg goed tot kennismaken met deze drank.’

Teeling is eigenlijk nog erg jong en toch hebben ze al heel wat awards en medailles weten op te strijken. Hoe komt dat? Zijn jullie dan zo goed?

‘Ik denk dat we erg veel geluk gehad hebben (gevolgd door een bulderlach)! We hebben onze focus altijd op de whiskey gelegd. Teeling’s ervaring met onder andere Cooley heeft ons geleerd dat de liquid het belangrijkste is. We beseffen dat het merk, de verpakking en de prijszetting van belang zijn, maar onze eerste bekommernis is dat de consument onze whiskey lekker vindt.’

Alex wijst naar een reeks flessen van Teeling die op het schap staan in TastToe te Boortmeerbeek, waar dit interview plaatsvind.

‘We mikken vooral op smaak en dat verklaart waarom er zoveel verschillende expressies bestaan in ons gamma. De verschillende vattypes…’

Mijn oogt valt op de Brabazon, een persoonlijke favoriet van me.

De Brabazon vind ik een beetje ‘funky’, en daardoor één van mijn persoonlijke favorieten. Vooral batch 1 op sherry vind ik geweldig, beter dan de tweede batch op portovaten.

‘Tja, sherry en port zijn natuurlijk niet nieuw en worden in de whisky industrie vaak gebruikt, maar ik vond het leuk om deze te maken. Maar de meningen lopen erg uit elkaar. They split the room. De ene houdt van batch 1, de andere wil enkel batch 2. Persoonlijk hou ik meer van batch 2!’

Oké, dit gesprek is voorbij… (lacht)

‘Hahaha, dat is het dan! Leuk je ontmoet te hebben!’ (lacht)

Vandaag bent u hier om de nieuwe Single Pot Still van Teeling voor te stellen. Wat is Single Pot Still eigenlijk en hoe onderscheidt het zich van andere whiskey?

‘Single Pot Still is uniek en wordt enkel in Ierland toegepast. Het is een whiskey die gestookt wordt van een mash die uit zowel gemoute als ongemoute gerst bestaat. Je neemt een deel gerst van het veld – dat is je ongemoute gerst. Een ander deel ga je mouten door het te steepen in water en dan te op de moutvloer te laten drogen. Dat is je gemoute gerst. Die wordt gebruikt voor bier en single malt. In Ierland hebben we dus de traditie om dit type recept te gebruiken (bij Teeling is dat 50-50, nvdr) om onze whiskey te maken.’

‘Het kan een verwarrende term zijn, omdat mensen het associëren met de pot still, de alambiek en denken dan misschien ‘Oh, een single malt kan ook een single pot still zijn’, maar dat is dus niet het geval. Het gaat ‘m om het recept.’

‘De benaming is eigenlijk historisch afkomstig van het feit dat de industrie zich wilde afzetten tegen de producenten van graanwhiskey, die toen silent spirits werden genoemd. We weten vandaag wel beter. Graanwhisky is zeker niet silent, maar in een ver verleden wilde de malt whiskey producenten zich onderscheiden van de grain die in kolomstills werd geproduceerd. En dus besloten ze een naam te bedenken die synoniem stond voor de iconische vorm van de alambiek, maar het gaat ‘m dus om het recept.’

De eerste batch van de nieuwe Single Pot Still was enkel beschikbaar in Ierland en als ik me goed herinner werden de eerste 100 flessen geveild voor het goede doel?

‘Inderdaad. En de eerste flessen veilden we. Fles nummer één haalde meer dan £10.000 pond op, het hoogste bedrag ooit betaald voor een nieuwe release van een jonge distilleerderij. Daar zijn we wel erg trots op.’

Maar vandaag kunnen we hem eindelijk ook in België proeven.

‘Inderdaad. En ‘eindelijk’ is goed gekozen, want het is een lange weg geweest. Het opzetten van het bedrijf, ideeën en dromen delen en proberen waar te maken… het duurt wel even om alle energie – en al het geld (lacht) – samen te krijgen, de onderdelen van de distilleerderij bestellen, de volledige bouw en ga zo maar door… om dan uiteindelijk de whiskey te beginnen maken. En dan moet je natuurlijk ook nog drie jaar wachten alvorens je je product ook effectief whiskey kan noemen.’

‘Voor ons is het dus best wel spannend om hier vandaag te zijn om onze nieuwe whiskey voor te stellen. Het is een key moment in de geschiedenis van Teeling. En naar ik hoop ook voor de Ierse whiskey. Dit is het moment waarop we Pot Still terug naar Dublin brengen.’

‘Maar om van Pot Still terug een bloeiende categorie te maken, moeten er natuurlijk meerdere producenten zijn. We hebben ‘diepte en breedte’ nodig, als je me begrijpt. Net zoals jullie dat nodig hebben voor Belgisch bier of de Schotten met hun single malts. We hebben vele producenten nodig die vele stijlen produceren en ik hoop dat dat gebeurt met Pot Still en dat Teeling daaraan zijn steentje kan bijdragen.’

Daarna ging ik, net als een dikke twintig andere liefhebbers, aan tafel om te genieten van een heuse Teeling VIP Masterclass. Dat verslag kan je hier terugvinden.

May the Malt be with you.

Article source: https://blog.whivie.be/?p=4930

Teeling Single Pot Still – BeLux Launch Event

Op woensdag 11 september was ik te gast in TastToe te Boortmeerbeek voor een VIP Teeling Masterclass met niemand minder dan Alex Chasko, de Master Distiller Blender van deze Ierse distilleerderij. De reden van zijn bezoek: de officiële lancering van de nieuwe Teeling Single Pot Still whiskey.

Naast de gloednieuwe Single Pot Still whiskey, zou Alex ons verblijden met nog enkele andere Teeling expressies, waaronder de 24-jarige en zelfs de 30-jarige. Het moge duidelijk wezen: dit ging een avondje worden dat ik me nog lang zou heugen.

De familie Teeling zit al eeuwenlang in de whiskey-business. Immers, reeds in 1792 had Walter Teeling een distilleerderij in de Liberties wijk in Dublin. Dublin was met zijn 37 distilleerderijen op dat ogenblik het hart van de Ierse whiskeyindustrie. Fast forward naar 1987 en John Teeling – afstammeling van Walter – richtte de Cooley Distillery op die we allemaal kennen van populaire merken als Greenore, Tyrconnell, Locke’s, Kilbeggan en de geturfde Connemara.

Eind 2011 verkocht John zijn bedrijf aan Beam-Suntory en richtte zelf een nieuwe op in Dundalk. Zijn nieuwe Great Northern Distillery is operationeel sinds juni 2015 en produceert zo’n 30 miljoen liter single grain en 12 miljoen liter single malt per jaar.

Maar dat whiskey deze familie echt wel in het bloed zit, werd bewezen door de bouw van een compleet nieuwe distilleerderij in hartje Dublin – de eerste in meer dan 125 jaar – door de zonen van John. Jack en Stephen Teeling hadden het klappen van de zweep natuurlijk al bij Cooley geleerd en met een deel van de opbrengst van de verkoop aan Beam-Suntory konden ze in 2015 de Teeling Distillery bouwen. Met zijn drie pot stills – een wash still van 15.000 liter, een intermediate still van 10.000 en een spirit still van 9.000 liter – produceren ze zo’n 500.000 liter per jaar.

Een aantal family casks – die niet naar Beam-Suntory gingen bij de verkoop – stelde de Teeling broers in staat het merk al op de markt te zetten (en flink wat prijzen in de wacht te slepen), terwijl hun eigen spirit rustig kon rijpen.

Maar nu is de revival dus echt compleet, met de release van de nieuwe Teeling Single Pot Still. De eerste batch was enkel verkrijgbaar in Ierland (de eerste 100 flessen werden zelfs geveild voor het goede doel, waarbij fles nummer 1 maar liefst 10.000 pond opbracht!), maar Teeling is nu klaar om Europa te veroveren met deze nieuwe whiskey.

We werden hartelijk ontvangen in TastToe, een fantastische whiskytempel. Ik voelde me als een kid in the candy store en gelukkig was er nog even tijd om rond te kijken, maar hier moet ik later zeker nog eens terug komen. Het assortiment is adembenemend. En bovendien kreeg ik de mogelijkheid om Alex Chasko even apart te interviewen. U mag dat interview morgen verwachten. Eerst even terug naar vanavond.

De debatten werden geopend met een Boulevard’Eire. Dit aperitief werd samengesteld met Teeling Small Batch, Nardini Rosso en Chazalettes rode  Vermouth en bracht de stemming er meteen in. Na een kort openingswoordje van Rens, vertegenwoordiger van importeur The Nectar – die de organisatie van dit event op zich had genomen – nam de boomlange Alex Chasko het woord.

De in Oregon geboren Master Distiller begon met een korte voorstelling van Teeling, terwijl hij de Spirit of Dublin schonk. Deze new make spirit werd gebotteld op 52.2% en vertoont al heel wat fruitigheid. En het gaf Alex de mogelijkheid om meer uitleg te verschaffen rond het productieproces en de belangrijke invloed van gist.

Daarna was het de beurt aan de fles waarvoor we uitgenodigd waren: de Teeling Single Pot Still. In tegenstelling tot wat velen denken, verwijst de term single pot still niet zozeer naar de alambiek waarin de whiskey gestookt wordt. Het gaat om een uniek recept dat enkel en alleen in Ierland wordt gebruikt. De term single pot still is dan ook beschermd, vergelijkbaar met champagne of mattentaarten.

Het unieke is het feit dat de mash bill – het recept – bestaat uit 50% gemoute en 50% ongemoute gerst. Dat zorgt voor een rijkere, ietwat kruidige toets in de finale whiskey. Alle batches worden gebotteld op 46%.

Het ging een vergelijkend onderzoek worden, want Alex had zowel batch 2 als batch 3 mee, alsook de nieuwe ‘unbatched’ die als maatstaf zal dienen voor de volgende batches. Ze zullen dus niet meer genummerd worden, maar deel gaan uitmaken van de core range van Teeling.

Teeling Single Pot Still Batch #2 is goudkleurig met een mooie viscositeit. Hij is zoet en pittig, maar vertoont tegelijkertijd flink wat granige toetsen. Ik krijg wat abrikozen en banaan op de neus. Op de tong is hij verrassend zacht, maar het fruit moet nu toch de duimen leggen voor het graan. In de afdronk daarentegen komt hij mooi tot zijn recht. Die is lang en zacht. Hij kan zijn leeftijd niet verbergen, maar Alex benadrukt dat dat ook helemaal niet hoeft. Het pretendeert niet ouder te zijn, maar is een showcase van hoe goed een jong product al kan smaken. En in die optiek kan ik hem geen ongelijk geven.

Teeling Single Pot Still Batch #3 is iets lichter van kleur. Hij lijkt in vele opzichten op de vorige batch, maar ik moet bekennen dat het verschil significant is en – in mijn (on)bescheiden mening – een pak minder verfijnd. Misschien heeft het feit dat hier geen witte wijnvaten in de mix gegaan zijn daar iets mee te maken? Minder fruit, meer ontbijtgranen en meer tannine waardoor deze iets droger is. De afdronk is tevens korter.

En dan werd het tijd om de nieuwe ‘unbatched’ te proeven en… ja, die verschilt toch weer danig van zijn voorgangers!

Teeling Single Pot Still ‘Unbatched’ schenkt een pak donkerder. Alex vertrouwt ons toe dat voor deze release enkel oloroso sherryvaten gebruikt werden. En dat merkt je meteen op de neus. Die is rond en smeuïg, lekker zoet op geel en donker fruit met een hint van noten, onrijpe banaan en abrikozenconfituur. Helemaal op de achtergrond en absoluut niet storend krijg ik nog een hint van afgestreken lucifer. Ik vind hem onmiddellijk lekker. Op smaak zet dat zich door en merk je dat deze zijn leeftijd (ongewild) wel kan verstoppen. Blind zou je deze makkelijk 7 jaar geven. Hij is best verfijnd met zijn licht drogende afdronk. Dit wordt – zeker met het sympathieke prijskaartje van om en bij de 50 EUR – volgens mij een voltreffer.

Ondertussen werd ons een heerlijk gerechtje voorgezet. Een terrine van varkensschenkel met babyprei, mosterzaad en pastinaak. Dat was smullen en paste prima bij deze whisky (of is het andersom?).

Dat was meteen ook de ideale gelegenheid om wat beter kennis te maken met mijn tafelgenoten. Mijn makker Marc en ik hadden tegenover ons het sympathieke koppel Gunther en Ann, twee whiskyliefhebbers met een uitgesproken mening en een geweldig gevoel voor humor. Dat maakte de avond alleen maar prettiger.

Nadat we de Single Pot Still range getest hadden, zette Alex de kleppers op tafel.

Neem nu bijvoorbeeld de volgende whiskey: Teeling 24 Year Old Vintage Reserve die ik enkele maanden geleden voor het eerst mocht ontdekken (hoewel hij al sinds 2016 op de markt is). Deze overheerlijke caleidoscoop aan geuren en smaken viel mij bijzonder mee. Dit stooksel uit september 1991 wond dit jaar bovendien de titel Best Single Malt op de World Whisky Awards. Ik ben niet verbaast. En toen ik mijn originele tasting notes in april schreef, stelde ik het volgende: ‘Turf?! Ja, ik geloof van wel.’ Alex bevestigde vanavond mijn vermoeden. Slechts 5ppm, maar mijn smaakpapillen hadden het dus bij het rechte eind.

Gunther vond hem ook erg lekker, maar niet in de zin van ‘geef me er nog maar eentje’. En laat zijn betere helft nu net de Bob van dienst zijn. ‘Mark, wil jij mijn glas dan?’ Beleefd als ik ben, wilde ik de dame tegenover mij niet teleurstellen, deze heerlijke nectar niet verloren laten gaan en… offerde ik me op. Zo ben ik nu eenmaal.

En terwijl we genoten van dit goddelijke vocht kregen we een lekkere Irish Stew van lamsschouder. Het was een klein kunstwerkje. Kudos aan de catering!

Het feestje was echter nog niet helemaal afgelopen. Alex had immers ook de Teeling 30 Year Old meegebracht, een single malt die in 1987 werd gestookt en 25 jaar rijpte op bourbonvaten en dan nog 5 jaar mocht slapen op White Burgundy vaten. Slechts 500 flessen van dit goedje werden op de markt gebracht en de kostprijs is niet van de poes. Reken op 1500 – 1750 EUR. Maar dat hij erg, erg lekker is, daar valt niet over te redetwisten. Na een eerste vleugje aceton – dat gelukkig snel wegtrekt – krijg ik geprakte banaan met Graeffesuiker, nectarine, mandarijn en perzik. Op smaak komen daar nog groene druiven en aalbessen bij. De afdronk is middellang, maar succulent en soothing. Een absolute topper. Op de vraag waar deze werd geproduceerd, kon Alex helaas geen antwoord geven. Mijn smaakpapillen schreeuwen Bushmills. Alex: ‘I can neither confirm, nor deny.’ Fair enough.

Wow, wat een uitstekende line-up. Uiteraard zijn de laatste twee een tikkeltje buiten categorie, maar ik kijk alvast uit naar de ‘unbatched’ Single Pot Still. Die verdient zeker een plekje in de barkast.

Na het officiële gedeelte was er nog ruimschoots de tijd op na te praten met de aanwezigen en werd er nog een after dinner cocktail op tafel getoverd: The Phoenix’ Neck, een heerlijke mix van Teeling Single Grain, enkele aromatische bitters en Erasmus Bond Ginger Ale. Een leuke afsluiter!

Bij het afscheid nemen werden we nog een leuk geschenkje in de handen gedrukt: een Teeling T-shirt. Wat een leuke attentie. Een groot woord van dank ben ik dan ook verschuldigd aan The Nectar voor de uitnodiging op dit geweldige evenement. Ik ben een tikkeltje gevoelig aan organisatie van een evenement (beroepsmisvorming, wellicht) en het maakt me dan ook altijd blij als een event vlekkeloos verloopt. Dat was hier absoluut het geval. Dikke proficiat.

Lekker spul geproefd in goed gezelschap, met lekker hapjes, een leuke spreker in een topkader. What’s not to like?

May the Malt be with you.

Article source: https://blog.whivie.be/?p=4913

Winners Revealed in Inaugural Scottish Whisky Awards – Scotch Whisky News

Winners Revealed in Inaugural
Scottish Whisky Awards

The winners in the inaugural competition to assess the business of Scotch whisky have been revealed at a sell-out event held in Edinburgh last night.

The Scottish Whisky Awards welcomed over 400 guests to celebrate and to hear who had been crowned the best in the wide-ranging competition which assesses taste and business performance.

Scottish Whisky Distillery of the Year 2019 was presented to The GlenAllachie Distillery in recognition of an outstanding year of business and after winning five medals in the blind tasting competition. The distillery has successfully served a full range of single malt into the market, opened a visitor centre and created a strong distribution network.  Their awards haul included two gold medals for their 18 and 12 year old single malts.   Craigellachie, Glen Scotia, Highland Park and Loch Lomond Distilleries were also nominated in the category.

Angus-based Arbikie Distilling collected the award for the Newcomer of the Year and were applauded by the judging panel for their field to bottle ethos and innovative approach.  They also collected a silver medal for Arbikie Highland Rye in the single grain category.

Other winners on the night included Johnnie Walker White Walker for their Game Of Thrones campaign whilst the Glasgow Distillery Company triumphed with multiple awards for their recently launched 1770 Single Malt.

Professor Alan Wolstenholme, Chair of the Judging panel commented;

 “Very many congratulations to the winners in the inaugural Scottish Whisky Awards.  Winning a Scottish Whisky Award is a huge opportunity to further the promotion of Scotch whisky at home and abroad. I hope that all the medallists and winners take the opportunity to promote their success and achievements in what was a very tough competition.”

The awards are supported by commercial sponsors including Shawbrook Bank and Bruce Stevenson.

Kevin Boyd, Managing Director at Shawbrook Bank commented;

“Congratulations to all the finalists and winners in the inaugural Scottish Whisky Awards.  Shawbrook Bank are proud supporters of our whisky industry and we are delighted to support these awards and their work to promote the business of Scotch and all our wonderful whiskies at home and abroad.”

Graeme Dempster, Account Executive at Bruce Stevenson Insurance Brokers commented;

“We’d like to congratulate all the finalists and winners at the Scottish Whisky Awards. The quality of talent up for nomination clearly demonstrates the strength of the Scotch Whisky industry today.  At Bruce Stevenson, we’re very proud to have a wide-ranging and deep involvement in such an exciting and growing sector.”

The awards also recognised one of the whisky industry’s most accomplished scientific and technical advisers with a special award presented posthumously to Dr Jim Swan.  The award for outstanding contribution to Scotch whisky was accepted by Dr Swan’s daughters and was presented in recognition of his forty-year career as a research scientist and trusted adviser to whisky distilleries around the world.  The award will be presented annually as The Jim Swan Award for Services to Scotch Whisky to an individual making a significant contribution to the Scotch Whisky industry.

Full results in the competition were unveiled for the first-time last night after being held as a closely guarded secret since the business and taste competitions were carried out in May.  In the taste sessions, adjudicated by the international sensory management consultancy, Cara Technology, over 100 whiskies were blind tasted and scored by a 32-strong judging panel from the UK, mainland Europe and Asia.

The awards which will now become an annual fixture and will be hosted in Glasgow next year, were also a fundraiser for two charities; The BEN, the Benevolent Society of the Licensed Trade of Scotland and the My Name’5 Doddie Foundation, set up by rugby legend Doddie Weir to help improve the lives of those affected by Motor Neurone Disease.

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2019/09/winners-revealed-in-inaugural-scottish-whisky-awards-scotch-whisky-news/