Infuse Spirits Rebrands Whiskey Brand Under New Name “Broken Barrel Whiskey,” Commencing with the Limited-Edition Single Oak Series – American Whiskey News

Infuse Spirits Rebrands Whiskey Brand Under New Name “Broken Barrel Whiskey,” Commencing with the Limited-Edition Single Oak Series

Infuse Spirits Group L.L.C., the first and only single-bottle infusion company and the spirit industry’s most popular craft infusion company, is excited to announce the rebranding of its whiskey line under the aptly named Broken Barrel Whiskey Co.

When Infuse Spirits first expanded its portfolio to include a Kentucky Bourbon called Broken Barrel, followed by the gold-medal winning Heresy Rye Whiskey, both delivered a message and method that became instantly discernible from Infuse’s vodkas and bitters. Whereas Infuse Spirits continues to steep its ingredients in the single-bottle infusions, Broken Barrel finishes and matures it’s whiskey with French Oak, ex-bourbon, and sherry cask staves in tanks before straining and bottling. This not only separates the two brands by process and style but illustrates how Broken Barrel Whiskey is unapologetically different from other whiskeys. Similar to a mash bill and equally as important, the company’s coined process called the Oak Bill—the selection of various oak barrel staves used to finish our products—is what defines the whiskey.

In this way, “the whiskeys follow their own path and seek to create a name for themselves by adhering to principles of originality, boundary-crossing, and unapologetic authenticity. By adding the barrel to the whiskey, not the whiskey to the barrel concept, we have created something different,” says Founder and Creator Seth Benhaim. If you are a collector, feel free to snag the fleeting designs of the “Infuse Spirits” titled whiskeys, as these will be discontinued and likely gone by early 2020, if not sooner! However, Broken Barrel Whiskey’s core products, Broken Barrel Bourbon and Heresy Rye, will not change price or recipes—they’ll remain the same as everyone knows and loves them.

So, now, the question: how does a rule-breaking producer continue to push the envelope? The limited-edition Single Oak Series is Broken Barrel Whiskey’s latest innovation. Under the new brand name, the company is releasing one-of-a-kind, limited bottlings of its Single Oak Series, which will offer three distinct expressions of oak-infused whiskey—Mizunara (50 ABV, 750 ml); Isle Of Peat (50 ABV, 750 ml); and Cask Of Amontillado (55 ABV, 750 ml)—with a suggested retail price of $50.

As Seth explains, “We deliver one-of-a-kind collaborations by maturing American whiskey with rare oak from around the world. We’ve sourced our whiskey for these bottles from Kentucky and Indiana, and married each blend with oak barrel staves from all around the world: Japan for rare Mizunara oak; Scotland for peated Islay Scotch barrels; and Spain for aged amontillado sherry. Each barrel gives the whiskey a unique, rich, and complex taste and character not commonly found in American whiskey. Additionally, unlike Broken Barrel Whiskey’s core bourbon and rye, the Single Oak Series’ bases are all blends: Mizunara is a blend of five-year-old Kentucky and four-year-old Indiana corn whiskeys; Isle of Peat is a blend of American wheat and single-malt whiskeys; and The Cask of Amontillado is a blend of 12-year-old American whiskey and five-year-old Kentucky corn whiskey. The result is a synthesis nowhere to be found with traditional whiskey, and luckily, the project has paid off tremendously. The Single Oak Series has already won a few authoritative awards. At this year’s San Francisco World Spirits Competition, Isle of Peat received a Double Gold Medal in the Wheat Whisk(e)y category and Cask of Amontillado took home a Silver Medal in the Other Whisk(e)y category.

All three limited-edition expressions will be available nationwide in September 2019.

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2019/09/infuse-spirits-rebrands-whiskey-brand-under-new-name-broken-barrel-whiskey-commencing-with-the-limited-edition-single-oak-series-american-whiskey-news/

Infuse Spirits Rebrands Whiskey Brand Under New Name “Broken Barrel Whiskey,” Commencing with the Limited-Edition Single Oak Series – American Whiskey News

Infuse Spirits Rebrands Whiskey Brand Under New Name “Broken Barrel Whiskey,” Commencing with the Limited-Edition Single Oak Series

Infuse Spirits Group L.L.C., the first and only single-bottle infusion company and the spirit industry’s most popular craft infusion company, is excited to announce the rebranding of its whiskey line under the aptly named Broken Barrel Whiskey Co.

When Infuse Spirits first expanded its portfolio to include a Kentucky Bourbon called Broken Barrel, followed by the gold-medal winning Heresy Rye Whiskey, both delivered a message and method that became instantly discernible from Infuse’s vodkas and bitters. Whereas Infuse Spirits continues to steep its ingredients in the single-bottle infusions, Broken Barrel finishes and matures it’s whiskey with French Oak, ex-bourbon, and sherry cask staves in tanks before straining and bottling. This not only separates the two brands by process and style but illustrates how Broken Barrel Whiskey is unapologetically different from other whiskeys. Similar to a mash bill and equally as important, the company’s coined process called the Oak Bill—the selection of various oak barrel staves used to finish our products—is what defines the whiskey.

In this way, “the whiskeys follow their own path and seek to create a name for themselves by adhering to principles of originality, boundary-crossing, and unapologetic authenticity. By adding the barrel to the whiskey, not the whiskey to the barrel concept, we have created something different,” says Founder and Creator Seth Benhaim. If you are a collector, feel free to snag the fleeting designs of the “Infuse Spirits” titled whiskeys, as these will be discontinued and likely gone by early 2020, if not sooner! However, Broken Barrel Whiskey’s core products, Broken Barrel Bourbon and Heresy Rye, will not change price or recipes—they’ll remain the same as everyone knows and loves them.

So, now, the question: how does a rule-breaking producer continue to push the envelope? The limited-edition Single Oak Series is Broken Barrel Whiskey’s latest innovation. Under the new brand name, the company is releasing one-of-a-kind, limited bottlings of its Single Oak Series, which will offer three distinct expressions of oak-infused whiskey—Mizunara (50 ABV, 750 ml); Isle Of Peat (50 ABV, 750 ml); and Cask Of Amontillado (55 ABV, 750 ml)—with a suggested retail price of $50.

As Seth explains, “We deliver one-of-a-kind collaborations by maturing American whiskey with rare oak from around the world. We’ve sourced our whiskey for these bottles from Kentucky and Indiana, and married each blend with oak barrel staves from all around the world: Japan for rare Mizunara oak; Scotland for peated Islay Scotch barrels; and Spain for aged amontillado sherry. Each barrel gives the whiskey a unique, rich, and complex taste and character not commonly found in American whiskey. Additionally, unlike Broken Barrel Whiskey’s core bourbon and rye, the Single Oak Series’ bases are all blends: Mizunara is a blend of five-year-old Kentucky and four-year-old Indiana corn whiskeys; Isle of Peat is a blend of American wheat and single-malt whiskeys; and The Cask of Amontillado is a blend of 12-year-old American whiskey and five-year-old Kentucky corn whiskey. The result is a synthesis nowhere to be found with traditional whiskey, and luckily, the project has paid off tremendously. The Single Oak Series has already won a few authoritative awards. At this year’s San Francisco World Spirits Competition, Isle of Peat received a Double Gold Medal in the Wheat Whisk(e)y category and Cask of Amontillado took home a Silver Medal in the Other Whisk(e)y category.

All three limited-edition expressions will be available nationwide in September 2019.

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2019/09/infuse-spirits-rebrands-whiskey-brand-under-new-name-broken-barrel-whiskey-commencing-with-the-limited-edition-single-oak-series-american-whiskey-news/

MACALLAN LALIQUE- 50 YEAR OLD LEADS BONHAMS WHISKY SALE IN EDINBURGH – Scotch Whisky News

MACALLAN LALIQUE- 50 YEAR OLD LEADS BONHAMS WHISKY SALE IN EDINBURGH

Macallan Lalique- 50 year old. Estimate: £67,000-93,000.

Two bottles of one of the world’s most sought-after whiskies, the Macallan Lalique- 50 year old lead Bonhams Fine Whisky sale in Edinburgh on Wednesday 9 October. They are each estimated at £67,000-93,000.

The Macallan Lalique-50 year old is the first of The Lalique Six Pillars Collection of the distillery’s rarest single malts, released between 2006-2016. Distilled and bottled by The Macallan Distillers Ltd., Easter Elchies, Craigellachie, it is said to have the aroma of cumin, cardamom and maraschino, and a taste of dark prunes and plain chocolate.

Other highlights include:

·         Three bottles of Back Bowmore – 1964; one each of the first second and third editions. Estimate for each bottle:  £18,000-20,000. Black Bowmore 1964 first edition was bottled in 1993 in a production run of 2,000 bottles. The second edition followed in 1994 – when, again, production was limited to 2,000 bottles. The third, and final, bottling, in an edition of 1,812, took place in 1995.

·         Rolling Stones Suntory-50th Anniversary. Estimate: £25,000-35,000. The whisky is a blend of selected malts distilled in milestone years in the history of the Rolling Stones, including a malt from 1962 – the year the band was formed – that has been aged in mizunara (Japanese oak) casks. The blend also contains whisky from 1971, when the famous ‘tongue and lips’ logo was launched; it’s said to be one of the most famous brand images in the world, and the original art work is in the collection of the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

Bonhams whisky specialist in Edinburgh Martin Green said, “In a strong sale the exceptional Macallan Lalique- 50 year old stands out. This is one of the world’s great whiskies. It doesn’t appear at auction very often, so I expect a lot of interest from collectors.”

Follow the link to the online sale catalogue: https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/25369/

Sale: Fine Whisky Location: 22 Queen Street Edinburgh EH2Date: Wednesday 9 October at 11 am

NOTES 

Bonhams, founded in 1793, is one of the world’s largest and most renowned auctioneers, offering fine art and antiques, motor cars and jewellery. The main salerooms are in London, New York, Los Angeles and Hong Kong, with auctions also held in Knightsbridge, Edinburgh, Paris, San Francisco and Sydney. With a worldwide network of offices and regional representatives in 22 countries, Bonhams offers advice and valuation services in 60 specialist areas. For a full list of forthcoming auctions, plus details of Bonhams specialist departments, please visit bonhams.com. bonhams.com

 

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2019/09/macallan-lalique-50-year-old-leads-bonhams-whisky-sale-in-edinburgh-whisky-news/

MACALLAN LALIQUE- 50 YEAR OLD LEADS BONHAMS WHISKY SALE IN EDINBURGH – Scotch Whisky News

MACALLAN LALIQUE- 50 YEAR OLD LEADS BONHAMS WHISKY SALE IN EDINBURGH

Macallan Lalique- 50 year old. Estimate: £67,000-93,000.

Two bottles of one of the world’s most sought-after whiskies, the Macallan Lalique- 50 year old lead Bonhams Fine Whisky sale in Edinburgh on Wednesday 9 October. They are each estimated at £67,000-93,000.

The Macallan Lalique-50 year old is the first of The Lalique Six Pillars Collection of the distillery’s rarest single malts, released between 2006-2016. Distilled and bottled by The Macallan Distillers Ltd., Easter Elchies, Craigellachie, it is said to have the aroma of cumin, cardamom and maraschino, and a taste of dark prunes and plain chocolate.

Other highlights include:

·         Three bottles of Back Bowmore – 1964; one each of the first second and third editions. Estimate for each bottle:  £18,000-20,000. Black Bowmore 1964 first edition was bottled in 1993 in a production run of 2,000 bottles. The second edition followed in 1994 – when, again, production was limited to 2,000 bottles. The third, and final, bottling, in an edition of 1,812, took place in 1995.

·         Rolling Stones Suntory-50th Anniversary. Estimate: £25,000-35,000. The whisky is a blend of selected malts distilled in milestone years in the history of the Rolling Stones, including a malt from 1962 – the year the band was formed – that has been aged in mizunara (Japanese oak) casks. The blend also contains whisky from 1971, when the famous ‘tongue and lips’ logo was launched; it’s said to be one of the most famous brand images in the world, and the original art work is in the collection of the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

Bonhams whisky specialist in Edinburgh Martin Green said, “In a strong sale the exceptional Macallan Lalique- 50 year old stands out. This is one of the world’s great whiskies. It doesn’t appear at auction very often, so I expect a lot of interest from collectors.”

Follow the link to the online sale catalogue: https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/25369/

Sale: Fine Whisky Location: 22 Queen Street Edinburgh EH2Date: Wednesday 9 October at 11 am

NOTES 

Bonhams, founded in 1793, is one of the world’s largest and most renowned auctioneers, offering fine art and antiques, motor cars and jewellery. The main salerooms are in London, New York, Los Angeles and Hong Kong, with auctions also held in Knightsbridge, Edinburgh, Paris, San Francisco and Sydney. With a worldwide network of offices and regional representatives in 22 countries, Bonhams offers advice and valuation services in 60 specialist areas. For a full list of forthcoming auctions, plus details of Bonhams specialist departments, please visit bonhams.com. bonhams.com

 

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2019/09/macallan-lalique-50-year-old-leads-bonhams-whisky-sale-in-edinburgh-whisky-news/

The Whisky Exchange “Casks – a glossary of terms” – Whisky News

Casks – a glossary of terms

There are lots of technical terms bandied around when talking about casks. This list will demystify some of them.

Amburana – a South American hardwood, occasionally used for maturing cachaça and very occasionally for maturing whiskey. It imparts a distinctive tonka-bean flavour, combining vanilla, coconut and cherries.

American Oak – an oak native to America, Most commonly used to mature American whiskey when new, but reused to age and rest many other spirits around the world. Also known as Quercus Alba.

American Standard Barrel – a 200 litre cask.

Angel’s Share – the spirit that evaporates from cask while it is maturing.

Barrel – strictly speaking, an abbreviation of American Standard Barrel, but often used (inaccurately) to refer to any type of cask.

Bilge – the bulging section around the waist of a cask.

Blood tub – a 30-50 litre cask

Bung – a piece of wood (or occasionally rubber) used to seal the hole in a cask

Bung cloth – a piece of hessian wrapped around a bung before it is inserted into the bung hole. It makes it easier to extract the bung and also helps keep the seal liquid tight

Bung extractor – a tool used to pull out bungs. It is screwed into the wood of the bung and then pulled to extract it.

Bung hole – the hole drilled out of the bilge or head to allow filling and emptying.

Bung stave – a stave with a bung hole drilled into it.

Butt – a 500 litre cask.

Casks being charred at Loch Lomond distillery

Char – the burnt top layer on the inside of many casks, which acts as a filter during maturation.

Chinkapin – a type of American white oak with scientific name Quercus Muehlenbergii. It is very rarely used in whiskey maturation.

Croze – the groove on the inside of a cask at top and bottom that the head slots into.

Dechar/Rechar – a cask that has had the layer of char scrapped off before being recharred. This rejuvenates the cask, exposing new wood to the spirit that is filled into the cask.

Dunnage warehouse – a traditional warehouse where casks are stored on the sides, racked on top of each other.

European Oak – a term that encompasses a number of different oak species, but is generally used to refer to Quercus Robur. The flavour characteristics of casks made from European oak vary widely depending on the provenance of the wood.

First fill – a cask that has been used once before and has been refilled.

Head – the circular section at the top and bottom of a cask.

Hogshead – a 230-250 litre cask. Often made by adding extra staves to an American Standard Barrel.

Hoop – a band of metal that holds a cask together.

Mizunara – a species of oak that is found in Japan and north-eastern Asia. Also called Quercus Mongolica.

Octave – a 50 litre cask

Palletised warehousing. The stacks often go much higher

Palletised warehouse – a warehouse where casks are stored on their ends, stacked on pallets which themselves are stacked on top of each other.

Paxarette – a concentrated wine used for flavouring and colouring. It was often used to season sherry casks, giving them a punchy of sherry flavour. However, the practise has been against Scotch whisky regulations since the late 1980s/early 1990s.

Pièce – a 205 litre cask most-often used in French wine-making.

Pipe – a cask used for maturing port. 350+ litres in size, and usually closer to 500 litres.

Quarter cask – a 125 litre cask, one quarter of a butt.

Quarter-sawn – a method of breaking down a log such a way that the grain is more vertical through the planks. It increases the strength of the planks and allows more grain contact when they are made into casks.

Quercus Alba – the scientific name of American white oak.

Quercus Mongolica – the scientific name for Mizunara.

Quercus Robur – the scientific name of the most common type European oak.

Racked warehouse – a warehouse with shelves for storing casks on their sides.

Reed – a piece of material (traditionally dried reeds) pressed between the head and the croze to make a cask water-tight at the ends.

Refill cask – a cask that has been used to store spirit at least twice: first as virgin oak, then as first-fill then as refill.

Rejuvenated cask – another term for dechar/rechar.

Seasoned cask – casks that have had another liquid stored in them specifically to infuse the wood with some of the characteristics of that liquid.

Seasoning – the process of drying a piece of wood to make it more suitable for use as in building a cask.

Shave/Toast/Rechar aka STR – a process similar to dechar/rechar where a cask has a small amount of wood removed from the inside of the cask to reveal more active wood, which is then toasted and recharred. A method pioneered by the late Dr Jim Swan.

A solera. Image courtest of SherryNotes

Solera – in sherry, a system of continuous fractional blending where a notional row of casks is combined by occasionally drawing some sherry from the final cask, leaving the cask still with liquid in, and then refilling it from the previous cask in the row. That cask is refilled from the previous one and so on until the first in the row, which is refilled with new sherry. In whisky, it often refers to a single vat from which a whisky to be bottled is drawn, without emptying the vat, before being refilled with a new batch of the same whisky.

Stave – one of the pieces of wood that make up the sides of a cask.

Sulphur stick – a stick of sulphur burnt inside a cask to disinfect it before filling. No longer commonly used, but some older casks still have a sulphuric note from their earlier use. Much hated by whisky-writer Jim Murray.

Toast – the process of heating the staves of a cask, activating the flavour compounds within and helping them bend into the shape.

Tun – a large vat used for marrying multiple casks.

Valinch – a long, tapered tube used for extracting whisky from a cask. The valinch is inserted through the bung hole and allowed to fill. The user then place their finger over the hole at the end, stopping air from getting into the tube, and the valinch is removed. As air can’t get in the end, the whiskey (mostly) stays in the tube, allowing it to be poured into a glass.

Virgin oak – oak that has not been exposed to a spirit before; a first-use cask.

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2019/09/the-whisky-exchange-casks-a-glossary-of-terms-whisky-news/

The Whisky Exchange “Casks – a glossary of terms” – Whisky News

Casks – a glossary of terms

There are lots of technical terms bandied around when talking about casks. This list will demystify some of them.

Amburana – a South American hardwood, occasionally used for maturing cachaça and very occasionally for maturing whiskey. It imparts a distinctive tonka-bean flavour, combining vanilla, coconut and cherries.

American Oak – an oak native to America, Most commonly used to mature American whiskey when new, but reused to age and rest many other spirits around the world. Also known as Quercus Alba.

American Standard Barrel – a 200 litre cask.

Angel’s Share – the spirit that evaporates from cask while it is maturing.

Barrel – strictly speaking, an abbreviation of American Standard Barrel, but often used (inaccurately) to refer to any type of cask.

Bilge – the bulging section around the waist of a cask.

Blood tub – a 30-50 litre cask

Bung – a piece of wood (or occasionally rubber) used to seal the hole in a cask

Bung cloth – a piece of hessian wrapped around a bung before it is inserted into the bung hole. It makes it easier to extract the bung and also helps keep the seal liquid tight

Bung extractor – a tool used to pull out bungs. It is screwed into the wood of the bung and then pulled to extract it.

Bung hole – the hole drilled out of the bilge or head to allow filling and emptying.

Bung stave – a stave with a bung hole drilled into it.

Butt – a 500 litre cask.

Casks being charred at Loch Lomond distillery

Char – the burnt top layer on the inside of many casks, which acts as a filter during maturation.

Chinkapin – a type of American white oak with scientific name Quercus Muehlenbergii. It is very rarely used in whiskey maturation.

Croze – the groove on the inside of a cask at top and bottom that the head slots into.

Dechar/Rechar – a cask that has had the layer of char scrapped off before being recharred. This rejuvenates the cask, exposing new wood to the spirit that is filled into the cask.

Dunnage warehouse – a traditional warehouse where casks are stored on the sides, racked on top of each other.

European Oak – a term that encompasses a number of different oak species, but is generally used to refer to Quercus Robur. The flavour characteristics of casks made from European oak vary widely depending on the provenance of the wood.

First fill – a cask that has been used once before and has been refilled.

Head – the circular section at the top and bottom of a cask.

Hogshead – a 230-250 litre cask. Often made by adding extra staves to an American Standard Barrel.

Hoop – a band of metal that holds a cask together.

Mizunara – a species of oak that is found in Japan and north-eastern Asia. Also called Quercus Mongolica.

Octave – a 50 litre cask

Palletised warehousing. The stacks often go much higher

Palletised warehouse – a warehouse where casks are stored on their ends, stacked on pallets which themselves are stacked on top of each other.

Paxarette – a concentrated wine used for flavouring and colouring. It was often used to season sherry casks, giving them a punchy of sherry flavour. However, the practise has been against Scotch whisky regulations since the late 1980s/early 1990s.

Pièce – a 205 litre cask most-often used in French wine-making.

Pipe – a cask used for maturing port. 350+ litres in size, and usually closer to 500 litres.

Quarter cask – a 125 litre cask, one quarter of a butt.

Quarter-sawn – a method of breaking down a log such a way that the grain is more vertical through the planks. It increases the strength of the planks and allows more grain contact when they are made into casks.

Quercus Alba – the scientific name of American white oak.

Quercus Mongolica – the scientific name for Mizunara.

Quercus Robur – the scientific name of the most common type European oak.

Racked warehouse – a warehouse with shelves for storing casks on their sides.

Reed – a piece of material (traditionally dried reeds) pressed between the head and the croze to make a cask water-tight at the ends.

Refill cask – a cask that has been used to store spirit at least twice: first as virgin oak, then as first-fill then as refill.

Rejuvenated cask – another term for dechar/rechar.

Seasoned cask – casks that have had another liquid stored in them specifically to infuse the wood with some of the characteristics of that liquid.

Seasoning – the process of drying a piece of wood to make it more suitable for use as in building a cask.

Shave/Toast/Rechar aka STR – a process similar to dechar/rechar where a cask has a small amount of wood removed from the inside of the cask to reveal more active wood, which is then toasted and recharred. A method pioneered by the late Dr Jim Swan.

A solera. Image courtest of SherryNotes

Solera – in sherry, a system of continuous fractional blending where a notional row of casks is combined by occasionally drawing some sherry from the final cask, leaving the cask still with liquid in, and then refilling it from the previous cask in the row. That cask is refilled from the previous one and so on until the first in the row, which is refilled with new sherry. In whisky, it often refers to a single vat from which a whisky to be bottled is drawn, without emptying the vat, before being refilled with a new batch of the same whisky.

Stave – one of the pieces of wood that make up the sides of a cask.

Sulphur stick – a stick of sulphur burnt inside a cask to disinfect it before filling. No longer commonly used, but some older casks still have a sulphuric note from their earlier use. Much hated by whisky-writer Jim Murray.

Toast – the process of heating the staves of a cask, activating the flavour compounds within and helping them bend into the shape.

Tun – a large vat used for marrying multiple casks.

Valinch – a long, tapered tube used for extracting whisky from a cask. The valinch is inserted through the bung hole and allowed to fill. The user then place their finger over the hole at the end, stopping air from getting into the tube, and the valinch is removed. As air can’t get in the end, the whiskey (mostly) stays in the tube, allowing it to be poured into a glass.

Virgin oak – oak that has not been exposed to a spirit before; a first-use cask.

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2019/09/the-whisky-exchange-casks-a-glossary-of-terms-whisky-news/

The Winter Queen Batch 2

Bottelaar: Adelphi
Regio: Schotland en Nederland
Fles: The Winter Queen 19 Year Old, Adelphi, Refill Sherry Casks, 400 bts
Kleur: brons
ABV: 54.5%

Lavendelsiroop

U herinnert zich misschien nog de eerste release van The Winter Queen, een zogenaamde fusion whisky van bottelaar Adelphi (Schotse whisky gemixt met Nederlandse), uit maart 2018. Die was zo succesvol dat er een tweede batch werd uitgebracht. Waar de eerste nog een blend van 9 jaar oud betrof, is deze toch een pak ouder. Hij werd – zo is mij verteld – samengesteld met Teaninich 1983, 20-jarige Bowmore en een Morllach uit 1993, aangevuld met het oudste vat Millstone dat het Nederlandse Zuidam te bieden had, namelijk 19 jaar oud. Merk op dat de andere componenten een pak ouder zijn! De naam verwijst naar de oudste dochter van de Schotse koning James VI. Elizabeth Stuart werd in 1596 geboren in Fife, maar bracht het grootste deel van haar leven door in Den Haag – vandaar de mix met Zuidam. Ik zou bijna durven zeggen: dat kan niet slecht zijn! Vreemd genoeg ligt het alcoholpercentage hoger dan de eerste, veel jongere versie!

Drogende, donkerzoete neus op espresso, geroosterd brood, hazelnoten en flink wat chocolade. Blauwe en rode bessen. Iets van pas geboend leder. Maritieme hint met wat zilt en vermolmd hout. Absoluut heerlijk.

Lekker olieachtig met een prima body. Erg kruidig op zwarte peper, zoethout en kruidnagel. Hint van bittere appelsienen, omfloerst met toffee en lavendelsiroop. Verbrand hout en woodsmoke verschijnen. Bijzonder knappe fusie, als u het mij vraagt.

Jongens, toch! Wat een lange, warme en drogende finish. Met een zilt eindstation.

De oplage is minder dan de helft van de eerste release, de prijs meer dan het dubbele. Dat gezegd zijnde: een dijk van een whisky! Dit is eentje om op het gemak van te genieten wanneer je niet gestoord kan worden. Om blij van te worden.

88/100

Geproefd door Mark Dermul op 22-08-2019
(om snel andere tasting notes te vinden, surf naar www.whivie.be).

Article source: https://blog.whivie.be/?p=4951

THE GLENDRONACH INTRODUCES LIMITED RELEASE CASK STRENGTH BATCH 8 – Scotch Whisky News

THE GLENDRONACH INTRODUCES LIMITED RELEASE CASK STRENGTH BATCH 8

The GlenDronach distillery is pleased to announce the eighth release of its Cask Strength Highland Single Malt Scotch Whisky, matured for ten years in Pedro Ximénez and Oloroso sherry casks from Andalucía. This expression offers connoisseurs a deeper insight into the distillery’s signature profile, by bottling the whisky at its natural strength of 61%, to bring the full depth of maturation in Spanish oak casks.

With each unique cask strength release, Master Blender Dr. Rachel Barrie selects the perfect marriage of sherry casks before bottling at cask strength and without chill filtration, as was the custom when The GlenDronach distillery was established in 1826. As with all of The GlenDronach expressions, the rich natural colour is drawn from the Spanish oak in which it rests.

Master Blender, Dr. Rachel Barrie said: “The GlenDronach Cask Strength Batch 8 is incredibly rich and full-bodied, the result of years of slow maturation in Pedro Ximénez puncheons, quarter casks and Oloroso sherry butts. Casks were individually selected, combined and bottled at natural cask strength to deliver maximum character and depth. Sip layers of sherry cask matured character unfolding slowly over time; from mocha, dark chocolate and caramel espresso to cherry cake layered with sultana and plum; the depth of character is boundless. The texture is like sipping velvet with a burst of sumptuous fruits, warm spices and intense dark chocolate which crescendos into The GlenDronach’s signature long and richly satisfying finish. I hope the most discerning palates will sip, savour and appreciate the full-bodied character
of Cask Strength Batch 8.”

Tasting Notes:

Appearance: Deep tawny gold.
Nose: Sandalwood, oak balsam and rich aromatic columbian coffee with dark manuka honey, cocoa and brazil nut.
Palate: Like sipping velvet with mocha, caramel macchiato and cherry chocolate cake, layered with dates, plum skin and sultana.
Finish: Savour the exceedingly long finish of espresso coffee and cocoa with traces of liquorice and cherry tobacco.
ABV: 61%
RRP: £62.00
The GlenDronach Cask Strength Batch 8 is bottled at 61% ABV and as is the case for all The GlenDronach expressions, is non-chill filtered and absorbs colour naturally over time from the Spanish oak in which it resides. It will be available to buy from specialist retailers worldwide from September 2019.

ABOUT THE GLENDRONACH DISTILLERY:

Visit: www.glendronachdistillery.co.uk
Facebook: /TheGlenDronach
Twitter: @Glendronach
Instagram: @Glendronach

Nestled in the valley of Forgue, deep in the East Highland hills, is The GlenDronach, one of the oldest licensed distilleries in Scotland. The GlenDronach is of true Highland style: a complex and full bodied spirit, perfect for slow maturation in Spanish sherry oak. At The GlenDronach Distillery, we have carried forth the tradition of our founder James Allardice since 1826, maturing our Highland Single Malt Scotch Whisky in the finest Spanish Pedro Ximénez and Oloroso sherry casks from Andalucía in Spain. Our richly-sherried Highland Single Malts are recognised for their deep colour and complex flavour profiles, which range from the sweet fruity flavours of the Pedro Ximénez casks we select, to the dry and nutty notes of our Oloroso casks.

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2019/09/the-glendronach-introduces-limited-release-cask-strength-batch-8-scotch-whisky-news/

THE GLENDRONACH INTRODUCES LIMITED RELEASE CASK STRENGTH BATCH 8 – Scotch Whisky News

THE GLENDRONACH INTRODUCES LIMITED RELEASE CASK STRENGTH BATCH 8

The GlenDronach distillery is pleased to announce the eighth release of its Cask Strength Highland Single Malt Scotch Whisky, matured for ten years in Pedro Ximénez and Oloroso sherry casks from Andalucía. This expression offers connoisseurs a deeper insight into the distillery’s signature profile, by bottling the whisky at its natural strength of 61%, to bring the full depth of maturation in Spanish oak casks.

With each unique cask strength release, Master Blender Dr. Rachel Barrie selects the perfect marriage of sherry casks before bottling at cask strength and without chill filtration, as was the custom when The GlenDronach distillery was established in 1826. As with all of The GlenDronach expressions, the rich natural colour is drawn from the Spanish oak in which it rests.

Master Blender, Dr. Rachel Barrie said: “The GlenDronach Cask Strength Batch 8 is incredibly rich and full-bodied, the result of years of slow maturation in Pedro Ximénez puncheons, quarter casks and Oloroso sherry butts. Casks were individually selected, combined and bottled at natural cask strength to deliver maximum character and depth. Sip layers of sherry cask matured character unfolding slowly over time; from mocha, dark chocolate and caramel espresso to cherry cake layered with sultana and plum; the depth of character is boundless. The texture is like sipping velvet with a burst of sumptuous fruits, warm spices and intense dark chocolate which crescendos into The GlenDronach’s signature long and richly satisfying finish. I hope the most discerning palates will sip, savour and appreciate the full-bodied character
of Cask Strength Batch 8.”

Tasting Notes:

Appearance: Deep tawny gold.
Nose: Sandalwood, oak balsam and rich aromatic columbian coffee with dark manuka honey, cocoa and brazil nut.
Palate: Like sipping velvet with mocha, caramel macchiato and cherry chocolate cake, layered with dates, plum skin and sultana.
Finish: Savour the exceedingly long finish of espresso coffee and cocoa with traces of liquorice and cherry tobacco.
ABV: 61%
RRP: £62.00
The GlenDronach Cask Strength Batch 8 is bottled at 61% ABV and as is the case for all The GlenDronach expressions, is non-chill filtered and absorbs colour naturally over time from the Spanish oak in which it resides. It will be available to buy from specialist retailers worldwide from September 2019.

ABOUT THE GLENDRONACH DISTILLERY:

Visit: www.glendronachdistillery.co.uk
Facebook: /TheGlenDronach
Twitter: @Glendronach
Instagram: @Glendronach

Nestled in the valley of Forgue, deep in the East Highland hills, is The GlenDronach, one of the oldest licensed distilleries in Scotland. The GlenDronach is of true Highland style: a complex and full bodied spirit, perfect for slow maturation in Spanish sherry oak. At The GlenDronach Distillery, we have carried forth the tradition of our founder James Allardice since 1826, maturing our Highland Single Malt Scotch Whisky in the finest Spanish Pedro Ximénez and Oloroso sherry casks from Andalucía in Spain. Our richly-sherried Highland Single Malts are recognised for their deep colour and complex flavour profiles, which range from the sweet fruity flavours of the Pedro Ximénez casks we select, to the dry and nutty notes of our Oloroso casks.

Article source: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2019/09/the-glendronach-introduces-limited-release-cask-strength-batch-8-scotch-whisky-news/

Bell’s 5 Year Old Extra Special

Bottelaar: Arthur Bell Sons
Regio: Schotland
Fles: Bell’s 5 Year Old Extra Special, b. 1980s, 750ml
Kleur: oud goud
ABV: 40%

Auldie

Arthur Bell is één van de belangrijke figuren uit de whiskygeschiedenis. Al in 1851 begon deze in Perth actieve blender zijn eigen whisky te maken, om er voor te zorgen dat de whisky consistent was in kwaliteit. Niet minder dan 40 malt- en graanwhisky’s gaan in de bekende blend, die in de jaren 1970 de absolute nummer één was in het Verenigd Koninkrijk en nu nog steeds erg goed verkoopt. Een belangrijk onderdeel is Blair Athol, aangevuld met onder meer Glenkinchie en zelfs een beetje Caol Ila. We proeven vandaag een auldie, uit de jaren 1980 met op het label de melding ‘over 5 years old’. Het predicaat ‘Extra Special’ werd zelfs in 1895 gepatenteerd!

Die neus staat me onmiddellijk aan. Warm op marsepein ananas, wat boomgaardfruit en Sirop de Liège. Kweepeer, kruisbessen en een hint van Turks Fruit. Een beetje snoeperig, maar tegelijkertijd erg uitnodigend. Ik krijg zin om deze snel aan de lippen te zetten en da’s altijd een goed teken.

De body is wel wat aan de lichte kant. Zoet en licht gepeperd, op meer boomgaardfruit (hiermee bedoel ik dus vooral appels en peren) en siroop, net als de neus beloofde. Hoewel de marsepein ondertussen vervangen is door toffee, blijft hij wel bekoren. Nogal eenvoudig, maar wel lekker. Drink gevaarlijk makkelijk weg.

De afdronk is best lang te noemen, waarbij de snoeperige kant van de zaak nog eens in de verf wordt gezet.

Nou, iets over een jaar terug had ik een oude Bell’s Extra Special (NAS) geproefd. Deze stamt uit dezelfde periode maar is wel stukken beter. Aangename verrassing.

83/100

Geproefd door Mark Dermul op 22-08-2019
(om snel andere tasting notes te vinden, surf naar www.whivie.be).

Article source: https://blog.whivie.be/?p=4947